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"Hij eet niet."

Translation:He does not eat.

4 years ago

40 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/MayuraVive

To people getting confused, duolingo wants the correct english translation, not a literal translation.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/strickjh2005

He eats nothing? Running that backwards yields "Hij eet niets." Can someone explain when you would use one over the other?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Braedonkenbeek

He does not eat

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/nodii7

But niet doesen't means nothing it means not

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/knittingarch

So is "he eats nothing" actually wrong or is this an alternate translation that needs to be added? It's what I wrote, but it was marked wrong.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/hajo24

I think adding niet at the end makes the sentence.negative. So its 'he eats not' directly but, it becomes 'he does not eat'

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/chiliwero
chiliwero
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This was covered in a similar thread... but in English, forming a negative like that is not grammatical unless it's an auxiliary or modal verb (be, shall, will, etc) ... so "she will not" is grammatical but "she eats not" is not.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/sanchopanca
sanchopanca
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While "she eats not" might sound odd and archaic, it is still grammatically correct. See for example "She loves me not" or "Forget me not". I think this form is still used in poetry.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/bleurabbit7

It seems that when negating a sentence like this "Hij eet niet", literal translation is "He eats not". However, this is improper English and must be translated as "He does not eat". The word 'does' is implied in Dutch. It is the same way in German "Er isst nicht". So when translating a simple sentence with just a subject, a verb and a negative, remember that 'does' is implied. "Hij eet niet" = "He (does) not eat".

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JamesSutto8

i don't consider it improper English, but it has fallen out of common parlance, until today....

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Lerura
Lerura
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The word "does" is not implied .- it doesn't exist.

It is not that the english "does <verb>" is collapsed into "<verb>" in dutch. Rather that english is saying it their own way. In danish it is "han spiser"/"han spiser ikke". - the same way as in dutch and german

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Noah960994

Edgar Alan Poe would disagree with "he eats not" being improper English.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/resurgam44

I suppose I've been spending too much time with Early Modern English, then. "He eats not" seems perfectly reasonable, to me, as a negated third person singular present indicative.

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Ursu_Brun
Ursu_Brun
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Niet = not, geen = none / at all, e.g. geen problem

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MegLauPhi

Why does neit come after eet?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ataltane
ataltane
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That's the way Dutch works. Just like Early Modern English - "He eats not".

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/varigby
varigby
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In northern England it is still common to hear people say, "he eats nowt." Nowt=nothing.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Harry_Mnn
Harry_Mnn
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He eats not?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/WarmFoothills

Are you suggesting that that should be added as a correct translation?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Harry_Mnn
Harry_Mnn
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yes

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/WarmFoothills

It's not really correct English..

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MINHL_DUCK

if it was old English it would be :)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/GotRIce420
GotRIce420
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We don't speak old english thought do we :)

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/FIIK

Guessing that would be marked wrong. When I answered a different question in that manner it marked me wrong.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Em.Jayne

Is 'hij eet niet' meaning more 'he's not eating (at the moment)' as in present contuous, or 'he does not eat (at all)' as in present simple or another interpretation 'he eats nothing (of that item/at the moment)' like 'he's not hungry' or 'he doesn't like that'

Sorry if these are a lot of interpretations and I'm off the mark on some.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/aanaka1

he did not eat ...is that wrong ..

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AtalinaDove
AtalinaDove
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Yes, as it is in past tense, not present tense.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Paulisepic

I used to think that it was normal to but adjectives before a noun like in english but both french and dutch don't do that so is it normal to put the adjectives before the noun?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/EricandMichelle

What is the difference between using "niet" and "geen" ?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/hedi76
hedi76
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Hi, it's the equivalent to "nicht" and "kein" in German. This link might help: https://www.duolingo.com/comment/3734833

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/leyciipuccino
leyciipuccino
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Okay so niet = nicht in German. I really like how similar these two languages are.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jp.erasmus

Think you would love Afrikaans then as well. It uses the word "nie" instead of "niet" and also "geen". The only difference is that it took inspiration from French and has double negation, ie. uses "nie" twice. But for a short phrase like this it would just be "Hy eet nie", the same as "Hij eet niet".

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/EvaOnescu

Is "niet" in Dutch like "nicht" is in German?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/hedi76
hedi76
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Yes exactly, it is.
niet = nicht
geen = kein

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AwesomeAim00

Is it also "he is not eating"?

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JuanAntoni154283
JuanAntoni154283
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So after all verbs we have to write NIET to make it negative?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Dutchesse722
Dutchesse722
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Yes, that would be correct. Hij werkt niet (he does not work), hij leest niet (he does not read), hij studeert niet (he does not study), ik doe het niet, (I'm not doing it), het geeft niet (it doesn't matter) and so on.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Silvio904829

It's like the same in italian. Hij eet niet = non mangia "niente", like niente is "nothing". Remember that geen is something like opposite of een: Hij eet een appel, hij eet geen appel. Or, using niet: Hij eet het appel, hij eet het appel niet. In this case, i think that we cannot put "geen", but niet, as "nothing".

9 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Dpuertaj

Would "Hij eet geen" be "He eats nothing"?

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Tony460265

Wow the guy was sure hard to understand on this one

1 day ago