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"Hiertussen ligt een huis."

Translation:There is a house among these.

0
4 years ago

50 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/kealiiballao
kealiiballao
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Can I assume that hiertussen implies two items the object is between?

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Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/FreekVerkerk
FreekVerkerk
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Hiertussen, means something like, "among these". If you pull open a drawer with a lot of rubish, you could say that somewhere here (hiertussen), there must be a screwdriver.

1
Reply10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ReneeDubuc

I'm confused. What are all the definitions of "hiertussen"?

6
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AlsEenPoffertje
AlsEenPoffertje
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Could you say, "Er ligt een huis hiertussen."?

3
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DutchDuoL
DutchDuoL
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Yes you can!

2
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AlsEenPoffertje
AlsEenPoffertje
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Whoo! I wasn't sure if that would be right, but I couldn't see a reason for it not to be. Thanks for confirming this!

1
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/FreekVerkerk
FreekVerkerk
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"Hiertussen ligt een huis" is al veel beter. Andere volgorde van de woorden. Alhoewel ik wel moeite heb om mij daar een beeld bij voor te stellen. Hiertussen? Waartussen, tussen de bergen? tussen de bomen?

0
Reply10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/austinsaragih

I believe "there is a house in between these" should be right. Or shouldn't it?

3
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Nierls
Nierls
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That would me "Tussen deze is er een huis" There's no "there", so don't add it.

0
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/fernanda.a982380

Why "these"?

3
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/nikanokoi
nikanokoi
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is "tussen" used as both between and among?

2
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/FreekVerkerk
FreekVerkerk
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yes

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Reply10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/nikbels12
nikbels12
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why not this and only these????

1
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Nierls
Nierls
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because there must be two things to be in between of ;)

6
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/FreekVerkerk
FreekVerkerk
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It could also be "this", that is correct, as in the sentence, Between this pile of paperwork there is, whatever you are looking for.

0
Reply10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/markvanments

Would have to be "Between these piles"... if there is only one pile you would always use among.

0
Reply10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/FreekVerkerk
FreekVerkerk
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Sorry: correction: "AMONG THIS pile of paper you would find the one paper you are looking for."

0
Reply10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Db243
Db243
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"a house is located between these" so ligt has is located below it in the help bubble but not accepted ;-{

1
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/FreekVerkerk
FreekVerkerk
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"liggen" is not a good word in relation to a house, because we say that a house is "standing". Do the english say: there a house is lying? You can see a penny lying on the floor, but for a house you have to look up; it is standing.

0
Reply10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/markvanments

Yes, we say that a lot of things lie. From https://en.oxforddictionaries.com/definition/lie are examples such as "‘After all, there would be no point in saving a building just for it to lie empty and rot."

You could also say that a house lies in a valley ('Half a century later, Abraham Lincoln would remember that this farm lay in a ''valley surrounded by high hills and deep gorges,''') but of course in the Netherlands there are no valleys so you always have to look up to a house.

0
Reply10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Ryan12313

What is the difference between "ligt" and "is"?

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Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/kealiiballao
kealiiballao
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It's a dutch thing... they like to describe the way something exists in regards to its position. For example, het boek ligt op de tafel. The book is (lying) on the table. het boek staat op de tafel. the book is (standing vertically) on the table. I learned that there are three common position verbs used when describing where or how something exists. It can sit, lay, or stand. Zitten, Liggen, of Staan.

17
Reply23 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Ryan12313

Ah, Bedankt!

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Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/kealiiballao
kealiiballao
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actually there are more position verbs. Staan, Zitten, Liggen, Hangen, Lopen. You'll learn them later in the course.

3
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/FreekVerkerk
FreekVerkerk
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In theory more verbs could be used, but Zitten, Staan and Liggen are the most common. But if you are for instance talking about a sail race. In the english language one could say: They are in the race. Translated to dutch that could be: Zij zijn in de wedstrijd or zij ZEILEN in de wedstriijd

0
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Joelson00

It can sit, LIE or stand. Lie (liggen) is intransitive, lay (leggen) transitive.

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Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jcbos
jcbos
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In this case 'ligt' is wrong, unless the house has collapsed. A house 'staat' in Dutch. Will report it.

4
Reply13 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Andy.Linde

I believe ligt can be used to describe a house/building if the building is sprawling and vast, perhaps like a mansion/palace or resort etc.

0
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jcbos
jcbos
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I am a native speaker and I don't think so. Even a herenhuis 'staat' in Dutch.

1
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Andy.Linde

If you look at this, we are taught that buildings can lie. Is this incorrect then? Scroll to point 6, and then see the "Buildings" section.

0
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jcbos
jcbos
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As far as I can see there, this applies to 'a geographical area or feature, such as a country, mountain, city, river, field, etc.', none of which is a building.

2
3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/FreekVerkerk
FreekVerkerk
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I am a dutch native speaker. A few examples: Het herenhuis staat aan de gracht, het kasteel ligt aan de vecht, de boerderij ligt in Gelderland. De weidegronden liggen in de polder. De flat staat in de Bijlmer. Not correct is: De domtoren ligt in Utrecht. De kantorenflat ligt aan de zuidas.(twijfel) De begraafplaats ligt aan de zuidas. (correct). So conclusion: There is some flexiblity but in general when something is tall it is standing and something flat is lying. In general a house is standing, as well as towers. Farmland and cemetries are lying. Farms, estates and castles are somewhere in between, they could both be lying or standing (not sitting)

2
2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/FreekVerkerk
FreekVerkerk
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Ja, maar een boerderij of een landgoed ligt.

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Reply10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tarekb85

"in between a house is located" Could anyone let me know why this should be considered a wrong option!

cheers

0
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rebekasto
rebekasto
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It is an incomplete English sentence, also kind of awkward wording. Unfortunately, many of the Dutch sentences are translated into incomplete English sentences in this -er section, so don't rely on them for good English. But in your case, what you said needs to be changed around a bit. English likes to put the noun first unless it's a question, so you should put the house in the beginning of the sentence. Then you should tell what is happening to the house, this is where the verb or action is happening, so you will put 'is located'. Then you put the rest of the sentence in an order that will make sense. So your sentence would sound best in English if you said, "A house is located in between". But, in English, unlike in Dutch, this sentence does not sound totally correct because you haven't explained what it is in between. In between what? You can easily answer that by saying "it". The house is located in between it. However, in this program, I am told that I am wrong when I add the 'it'. I am not wrong. English needs that word or some other word when you use 'in between'. The house is located in between the store and the garage. That's how we speak English. I hope I am not confusing you. Finally, the use of the word 'located' is somewhat formal. In fact, you could just not use it at all and say, the house is in between it. Because the Dutch uses the word 'ligt', you must translate it, but in this case it is comfortably translated by 'is'. I would also like to add that the English sentence they give is horrible. "There is a house among these" is just very unusual and not something one would expect to hear. When you say 'among' in English, you think of something in a pile, perhaps, so if I heard this sentence I would think of a child digging in a pile of Lego, looking for a house. That is not how I would understand the sentence in Dutch. By the way, my mother is a Dutch speaker, my father is an English speaker. I grew up in Belgium where they speak Dutch until I was ten, then moved to California in the US. I went to University in Belgium and US. So I speak both languages fairly well.

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Reply13 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tarekb85

Thanks a million! That helps me a lot indeed.

cheers

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Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/beloeng
beloengPlus
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Hier, daar and er refers to this, that and it when being connected to a preposition. With tussen there is an exception, as hiertussen/daartussen/ertussen means between these/those/them.

Am I correct?

0
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/YannickJan

Does anyone have an answer for this? Because I'm very confused about Hiertussen vs. ertussen. I thought 'hier' meant 'here,' and don't remember seeing it mentioned in the 'er' lesson.

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Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/kealiiballao
kealiiballao
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that makes sense. Tussen means in-between, so I guess you could assume that there are two things that something is inbetween of. If we think in English we'd want to say, Dezetussen, but I dont see that as being correct.

0
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Nierls
Nierls
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basicly.

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Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TequinaLof

Here inbetween is a house. Is alright too right ?

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Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Nierls
Nierls
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that's just strange english.

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Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/kealiiballao
kealiiballao
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Can anyone let me know if I'm on the right track? Ive been trying to understand this sentence fully.

Another possible English translation: In between these (the speaker referring to something the listeners also observe but does not explicitly state), there lies a house. The in between is referring to something that both the speaker and listener understand so the difficulty is that we are only translating a sentence without a context because we are not the speakers nor the listeners. Its like youre listening to a conversation between two people but you cannot see what they are referring to. Essentially, the statement is emphasizing the existence of home, rather than the objects surrounding the home.

Also, by using LIGGEN instead of STAAN, the house could be dwarfed by the surrounding objects. Like the little home is lying amongst giant buildings.

In order to help me understand how and why this would be said, I thought of Dutch tourists walking in downtown New York. They are surrounded by tall office buildings, hundred-story glass skyscrapers. Then as they stroll further along the same street one Dutch tourist comes across a little home, in between two huge office buildings, that seems out pf place. The Dutch tourist then turns to her/his friends who haven't yet stumbled on to the little discovery, and says, "Hiertussen, ligt een huis!"

Am I close to understanding this?

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Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/FreekVerkerk
FreekVerkerk
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I think you fully understand it. This sentence is never really said in holland because inbetween what should the house be standing? Maybe people are looking at a map, searching for a house, off which they only know that it is left of the river and under the mountain. Duo can be quite theorethical with ist owl, ducks etc. Just forget about any reference to real life. It is a kind of dutch humor, which even i as a dutch guy can't appreciate.

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Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/kealiiballao
kealiiballao
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That makes sense when I think about a map reference. If the speakers are descibing how to get to a location, and the listeners have never been to the area saying this could mean a way to describe a landmark to find another place.

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Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/StuartSutt1

I can understand 'hiertussen'. I can understand 'een huis'. Where does 'among these' spring from 'ligt !!! Totally baffled. This is the answer i am given via my smart phone.

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Reply1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Semeltin
Semeltin
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Well, maybe you can't understand 'hiertussen', after all.

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Reply11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/markvanments

Why is "A house is in here" wrong? The drop down for hiertussen gives "in here" as a possibility. For example, if you are walking by the side of a wood, could you say that "there is a house in here"?

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Reply1 year ago