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"Mies, joka asuu Italiassa, on kanadalainen professori."

Translation:The man who lives in Italy is a Canadian professor.

June 25, 2020

12 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CthvlhvsMagnvs

Cool: a non-restrictive relative clause introduced this early in the course.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/epingchris

Is it non-restrictive though? If I'm not mistaken, in Finnish the comma is always required for any clause. I wonder if Finnish makes the distinction between restrictive and non-restrictive relative cause (which is indeed a nifty feature, I'd say.)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/HastaLaVista83

This distinction between restrictive and non-restrictive relative clauses is kind of superfluous in my opinion. I'm no English native and although I learned English for more than ten years at school, I never came across this one. I only became aware of it some years ago, and I really don't understand why it's so important in English.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/epingchris

It's certainly not a necessary feature for a language (most languages do fine without it, including my native language and apparently Finnish), I just personally find it nice to be able to distinguish between the two every now and then. :p

I wonder where it comes from though - as it's a punctuation rule in English, it's likely that it's a relatively new "invention" by the grammarians. (I think some language uses word order to mark the distinction with adjectives, but I'm not sure.)


[deactivated user]

    Why not the man that lives?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AGreatUserName

    It's possible but less common than "the man who lives" and it sounds a bit less formal (and possibly even slightly derogatory to some people).

    Restrictive relative clauses:

    people: who (that - less common, often proscribed)
    things: that/which ("which" may be proscribed in some dialects)

    Non-restrictive relative clauses (with a comma!):

    people: , who ("that" is not possible)
    things: , which ("that" is not possible)


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mpre53

    In English, it's more common to use who for a person and that for an object.


    [deactivated user]

      Couldn't this have also been 'A man' rather than 'The man' ?


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/epingchris

      Okay, so there is no "Canadian language" strictly speaking... Let's take French as an example then: I suppose "ranskalainen professori" means a professor of French nationality/origin. So how would one say "a professor that teaches the subject of French"? "ranskan professori"? "ranskan kielen professori"?


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/pieni_chilipalko

      You could use either. If the context gives enough clues, "ranskan professori" is okay, but "ranskan kielen professori" is certainly less ambiguous (and the better alternative).


      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ella939416

      I misspelled "professor" as "proffesor" I don't think it's Finnish I need to learn right now XD

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