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  5. "Heillä on hauskaa Espanjassa…

"Heillä on hauskaa Espanjassa."

Translation:They are having fun in Spain.

June 25, 2020

10 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/belliavesha

Two questions.

1) Shouldn't "they have fun" be also accepted?

2) What is the difference, if any, with "He pitävät hauskaa"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Anna839191

1) Yeah 2) There's no difference really


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rk5I3
  1. Yes, and also "they will have fun."

  2. In my opinion, if you say "pitävät hauskaa," they are doing something fun more actively, whereas this translation doesn't indicate if they're actively searching fun things to do, or if someone else has prepared some fun activities or places for them.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/kkaita

I think 'heillä on hauskaa' could be translated they are having a good time. 'He pitävät hauskaa' is more like they are having fun as explained above.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/tjperi

Can someone explain why this requires the partitive?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/HastaLaVista83

Probably because fun is something you cannot count. Like "I have bread = Minulla on leipää".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ekhoc

"They have fun in Spain" was 'incorrect'. Reported.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Spinach_Sheik

They have fun implies a recurring action. For example, they have fun every time they visit Spain or they have fun whenever they are in Spain.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/kkaita

They have fun in Spain should be accepted.

How about they are having a good time in Spain?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Spinach_Sheik

They have fun implies a recurring action. Fun is the direct translation, but I don't think a good time would be incorrect.

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