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"Ik gebruik suiker."

Translation:I use sugar.

4 years ago

12 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/Jun-Dai
Jun-Dai
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That "ui" vowel always throws me. Still getting used to it :-)

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Susande
Susande
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Good luck, all I can say is: keep on listening, keep on pronouncing it. If you want to communicate in Dutch and don't care about having an accent, then hearing and pronouncing the vowels right is a lot more important than the consonants.

When pronouncing the ui in suiker incorrectly, you will probably be understood, but in these kind of words it is essential:

  • hier, hoor, haar, huur, hoer (especially the last two, you don't want to mix up paying your rent huur or your prostitute hoer)
  • bier, buur, boor, boer
  • buis, boos, baas
4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/marcos49088

Everybody does. Het is lekker! :D

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/EenZwaard

If i wanted to say 'he uses sugar' but the sugar is singular, is the dutch; 'hij gebruiken suiker'

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Susande
Susande
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Both in Dutch and in English, suiker/sugar is uncountable. Also nouns (in this case sugar) have no influence on the verb conjugation, only the subject and tense do. The verb conjugation of gebruiken (a regular verb) in the present tense:

  • ik gebruik
  • jij gebruikt
  • zij/hij/het gebruikt
  • wij gebruiken
  • jullie gebruiken
  • zij gebruiken
2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/CarlTipton1

Why not I take sugar? (which is a more usual formation in english) I take sugar in my tea. I use sugar in my tea . is a rather odd sentence. Or is this use sugar for something else?

10 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/dkpwatson

It depends on the context. You're assuming the sentence relates to a cup of tea. What if it referred to baking a cake?

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Roberto740984
Roberto740984
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I'm studying several germanic languages at the time and i can't find why this essential word is so different: use in English, gebruiken in Dutch, benutzen in German, använder in Swedish.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/CapnJake49
CapnJake49
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Gebrauchen is another German version of this word and its pretty close.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SeanMeaneyPL
SeanMeaneyPL
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I thought Dutch pronunciation was pretty consistent until I saw this sentence. Why the marked difference between the ui in gebruik and the ui in suiker? The first sounds like French pEU or English fUR, the second like German blau or English loud. The advice given at the start of the course was that the sound is closer to blau/loud or (Scottish) house. Is this apparent deviation an indication that verbs ending in uik get a sound closer to an o-umlaut?

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/El2theK
El2theK
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I think it's just the way you are interpreting it in combination with different letter combinations. Probably because there is no similar sound in English.

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SeanMeaneyPL
SeanMeaneyPL
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Possibly so. I'll persist and hopefully it will come right in the end. If I just say it as I hear it, I'm sure people will make allowances. I confess I've not tried speaking to a "local" yet. Never been to Holland, and "went safe" with French on my last trip to Belgium. Back in Belgium in the spring. Wish me luck!

11 months ago