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  5. "Heillä on kissa, jolla on mo…

"Heillä on kissa, jolla on monta lelua."

Translation:They have a cat which has many toys.

June 26, 2020

23 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/anonyneko

"that" or "who" should at least be viable alternatives


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Wippii

Yep, was about to comment the same.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/rueter.jack

"that" should definitely be an alternative if you are interested in making the English sound normal. I would prefer it to the "which", but we are not teaching English here, and I think you are doing a great job with the Finn.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KristianKumpula

Not only is "that" a viable alternative for "which" even though it's rejected, but the comma doesn't belong in the English sentence because the relative clause is restrictive. Edit: On second thought, this is one of those cases where the relative clause can be both restrictive and non-restrictive.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/zamlet

I interpret that slightly differently. I would say that the comma is optional in the English sentence and actually changes the meaning slightly. "They have a cat which has many toys." (no comma) means that the cat and the toys are pretty much inseperable and the toys are an important part of how you think about the cat. "They have a cat, which has many toys." (with comma) means that they have a cat, and, by the way, the cat has many toys, but they're not really important.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CyclOrBit

Commas in Finnish are used in a quite different way than in English


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/w3WLnVmI

"They have a cat that has many toys" should not be incorrect, it seems. Thank you.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/zamlet

I don't really understand this. I haven't seen the word "jolla" before and, though I can figure out it's probably a variant of the same stem that produces "joka", I haven't the faintest idea how it differs from "kenellä" or how to use it in a sentence.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TarjaVermeer

As I understood it, kenellä is the possesive form of kuka. But I might be wrong. Can some native speaker help us out here?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CyclOrBit

I guess that between 'Joka' and 'Kuka' there is the same difference that the English words 'Which' and 'who' have.

(And, of course, the 'lla' it's just the possessive form)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TarjaVermeer

I'm not a native speaker, but according to me kuka is always used in a question. Whereas joka always refers to someone/thing in the sentence preceding it. Joka can be in different forms, such as jolla is the possesive form of joka like CyclOrBit already said above.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/zamlet

I could be mistaken, but I don't think Finnish really has a true possessive form. I believe the "-llA" forms we're learning have more like an "at" meaning than one of possession. The possession is implied because the object is "at" you.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KristianKumpula

Finnish has possessive suffixes, but it's common to omit them when using colloquial language.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Kerry816867

What is the difference between 'kenella on' and 'jolla on' ?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TarjaVermeer

Kenellä on is used in a question: Who has (the puppies)? Jolla on is referring to something earlier in the sentence: (the cat), who has (the puppies)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Kerry816867

Thanks for that. Very helpful.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sarah803697

I think "They have a cat which has lots of toys" should be accepted. I personally would always choose "lots of" over "many" when talking about amounts. "Many" seems a little stuffy. Reported 22.05.21 in case.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CyclOrBit

What is the stem of 'jolla'?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TarjaVermeer

I think you mean the nominative form: joka


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KristianKumpula

It's in nominative case. The owner in an ownership clause must be in adessive case.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/clairelanc3

What is the difference between joka and jolla? I thought joka was for the subject, but apparently it's wrong.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KristianKumpula

The subject in "jolla on monta lelua" is "monta lelua". It's not the owner but rather the owned thing that is the subject in Finnish ownership clauses. The owner must in adessive case, which as a locative case cannot be attached to a subject because it expresses location and therefore functions as an adverbial. This also means that the subject in "heillä on kissa" is "kissa".

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