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  5. "Kuka haluaa kahvia ja pullaa…

"Kuka haluaa kahvia ja pullaa?"

Translation:Who wants coffee and pulla?

June 26, 2020

35 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ArlisArtoP

Pulla on pulla? Minun mielestäni pulla englanniksi pitäisi olla "Bun" tai samanlaista kuin tämä.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/annika_a

Yeah...that's what I would say as well.

But I guess the team has made a decision that a Finnish-style pulla just doesn't exist in the English speaking world in the same sense, and therefore it gets to keep its name, just like sisu and mämmi (but not pesäpallo, which is translated as nestball or something).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MaelickClaes

That's because almost no one in Finland, native Finnish speakers or foreigners translate those terms in English. Another such word is löyly.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/NicholasWa843871

I'm in Finland, and people I know translate it all the time.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/annika_a

Well, but I can eat buns in England which are very similar to Finnish pulla.

Not at all equivalent to the comparison of croissant and pulla below. These are not even at the same end of the counter in a café! :-)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Boarcas

You can also make hamburgers with buns, which are not very similar to pulla.

The problem with the translation attempts is that none of them really translate what pulla is, and some of them can also mean something completely different.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ArlisArtoP

The worst part? Even sanakirja.org translates "pulla" incredibly easily.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ludiv123

Keeping the word "pulla" makes sense, as food items often keep their original name in English if there is no perfect equivalent. A croissant is a croissant, not a bun, a chorizo is not called a "spicy red sausage", a tortilla is not called a "thin flat bread" and a crème brûlée is not called a burnt cream either.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Hacu.

Agreed. All the foreigners I know say pulla even when speaking in English.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Hyst111

I feel like there is no satisfying translation for neither pulla nor mämmi. Since every translation you try is not really correct.

Just take your "bun" suggestion. It is kind of the same, but also it's not. Typical example of "same same but different". Just do an Google image search for bun. I wouldn't call those things pulla. Maybe "pulla like". If you told someone: I am eating a bun, they wouldn't think of a typical pulla.

It would be like calling pesäpallo just baseball. It's kind of similar but definitely not the same thing. If I told someone (even another Finn): I am playing baseball. He or she does not think of pesäpallo. I would say: I am playing a baseball like game. So the person wouldn't confuse it with baseball.

Anyhow: country specific food or sports, which are not really widespread outside the borders are difficult to translate. So I am quite fine with the decision to just call pulla a pulla


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/annika_a

It's funny that you use pesäpallo as an example, as it is a word that is translated in this course...but which I have never seen translated anywhere else.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Hyst111

Well... I think pesäpallo shouldn't be translated. Only of there is a game in the English speaking world with exactly the same rules


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Juha_Metsakallas

Isn't India the biggest English speaking country in the world? They play pesäpallo there and call it …pesäpallo! Last year the world cup was arranged there in Pune. India did well.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/annika_a

Er... Pesäpallo really isn't the same as baseball, though. Tahko Pihkala did change quite a lot of stuff. You'll notice it when the baseball pitcher throws the ball at you, if not before! :-p

But yes, I do agree it shouldn't be translated in this course.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Hyst111

"Er... Pesäpallo really isn't the same as baseball, though. Tahko Pihkala did change quite a lot of stuff. You'll notice it when the baseball pitcher throws the ball at you, if not before! :-p"

My point exactly!!!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LazarevZubov

I asked Finnish some native speakers and no one of them thinks that "pulla" is some specific bun. All of them use this word as a general word for sweet pastries.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Juha_Metsakallas

Olet oikeassa, there are different types of pulla. There seems to be a Wikipedia article where pulla is called cardamon bread. It has images of different types, incl. pullapitko.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/annika_a

Do they bake? Pullataikina is a pretty specific dough, which of course you can then make many different things out of (even bilberry pie -- the disagreement about the correct dough to use for bilberry pie is almost as serious as the one about the correct filling of laskiaispulla).

The problem with the word bun is that that can also be a savory baked good, which pulla never is.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LazarevZubov

No idea. You don't need to bake to know how do you call a bun in your native language.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rk5I3

Can you use "bun" to also refer to slices of pullapitko? I believe "Haluatko pullaa?" can also mean that.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/annika_a

No, a bun is always one unit. (Well, split into two parts if it's a hamburger bun...)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Juha_Metsakallas

I have to disagree here. The combo kahvi ja pulla can mean that you get a slice of pullapitko.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/annika_a

The question and my answer are about the word "bun".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Juha_Metsakallas

Ah, my bad. Voitko selventää vastaustasi, niin otan tämän jatkokeskustelun pois?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/keithdavis19

In Duo suggestion you say "some pulla " so why mark it as wrong .correct or at least follow your own suggestions !


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Suda76286

this translation sounds off. Duolingo, I think you need to make up your minds whether to include an article or use a plural. you can talk about: tea and a biscuit - yup tea and biscuits - fine tea and biscuit - nope. just does not work. I don't see why pulla should be treated any differently... ??


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/annika_a

You certainly shouldn't use an article or the plural. Both things here are considered mass nouns: you're not offering a or the coffee or several coffees, etc.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rk5I3

Especially when this kind of offer for "kahvia ja pullaa" typically means that you'll get a coffee and a slice of a long, braided pulla called pullapitko. (But you almost never say "haluatko pullapitkoa?") Often, you also have a second serving.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Juha_Metsakallas

About the second serving…

The whole question concerns regular coffees, no expresso, latte etc.

In Sweden a second serving of coffee is very often included, gratis,. The phrase you see in signs there is Påtår ingår.

In Finland the situation varies. The most common model seems to be that you get a second serving at a highly reduced price, say 0,50 €. The phrase used for advertising this varies: lisäkuppi (standard) or santsi(kuppi) (coll., ← [de] Schanze) are the most common ones. There can also be big dialectal variations. For instance I would say in my home town Ei påtår hinta kuulu?, but I know that I might not be understood in other parts of the country.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/annika_a

There's a legendary café in Helsinki where they'll pay you 0.05 € if you have another cup of (drip) coffee. :-) It's a marketing gimmick, of course, but they do follow through on it.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TarjaVermeer

Why is the translation who wants coffee and a pulla wrong?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Boarcas

To be precise, that would be "kahvia ja pullan" (only one pulla). "Kahvia" and "pullaa" are both uncountable words, and it's the usual way to express this question.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TarjaVermeer

The strange thing is that sometimes in the previous part of the course was considered as a correct translation..


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/minhalse

So in the last question it had to be some milk so I put some coffee here and it says its wrong


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Juha_Metsakallas

Quite probably the alternative with "some coffee" hasn't been keyd in. Please report, if you think that it should be accepted.

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