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  5. "La pharmacienne m'a conseill…

"La pharmacienne m'a conseillé ce médicament."

Translation:The pharmacist recommended me this medicine.

June 27, 2020

256 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/angelo_vancouver

No, this English translation is wrong. It should be, "the pharmacist recommended this medicine to me"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Black_Cherries

You're right, there definitely needs to be a "to" in there.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/b_adger

Or remove "me" as it is implied. "The pharmacist recommended this medicine" is correct. I think this usage is the reason so many below think "to" is not required.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MarkFraser11

To is not required and no one has yet provided any authority to prove otherwise.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Tom560480

"Mary gave the ball to me." "Mary gave me the ball." We tend to include or omit "to" depending on the word order. "Mary gave to me the ball," though correct, sounds a bit foreign, at least with the verb gave. Not quite the same with "recommended." "The pharmacist recommended the pill to me." "The pharmacist recommended me the pill." The point here is that one would not tend to hear the second expression in native English, at least where I've been. Though not wrong, it is not conventional and to some sounds a little off. That's all people are saying here. If you want to include "me" in the translation, the first is what you would generally get from native speakers. I cite no authority.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jeanne448353

Bottom line, Duo's "correct response" to those of us who omitted "me"(assuming me was implied) or added "to" for "to me' got the item INcorrect. I sent an screen screen shot to Customer Service April 18, 2021 - hoping to see a correction.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MarkFraser11

No, that's not what people are saying. They are saying "to" is required. They are saying things like "You cannot omit the 'to' in this sentence in English. It is simply wrong without it.", with many upvotes.

Even the OP you are replying to says it "definitely needs to be..... there".

If they just are saying omitting the "to" is less common, or even that they don't prefer it, all of this could have been avoided. But they are saying it's wrong. Which in this case (and in all of the other myriad discussions where people do this on here) basically means "that's not how I would ever say it", so it must be wrong.

BTW your first example is a good one and points to why this is dubious (it is indeed quite the same).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DianaM

no one has yet provided any authority to prove otherwise

Ha, well, I would be most interested to learn what you would consider to be such an authority. I am not aware of any such person or body.

I've (mis-)spent rather a lot of time poking about, just to satisfy my own curiosity, and have found a few instructional sites that are reasonably respectable that seem to be unaware of the "recommend me" usage and none, so far, that counsel using it.

A sample:
https://www.oxfordlearnersdictionaries.com/definition/english/recommend
https://learningenglish.voanews.com/a/the-verbs-advise-suggest-and-recommend/5727628.html
https://esllibrary.com/blog/recommend#:~:text=For%20a%20focus%20on%20who,%E2%80%9D%20(recommend%2C%20suggest).&text=Recommend%20is%20more%20personal%20and,suggestion%20based%20on%20personal%20experience.

I have also read quite a lot of debate on the subject and it is certainly clear that some people do use this locution.

I will say, further, that it is not a usage that I have ever come across in books or newspapers. My inclination would be to classify it as "dialect" and non-standard.

But, of course, I am not An Authority.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/chargeronthenet

Dont need me or to me


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MarkFraser11

I appreciate your "poking around", as you put it. That's more effort than most others have expended.

I do not believe the absence of discussion of the "recommended me" usage in the links you posted is dispositive one way or the other. As you said, it's a common usage. As such, you would expect it to be just as likely pointed out as wrong as ignored.

Again, it is directly addressed in the link I posted on the other thread and if the usage is definitively wrong as so many have posted here I would have expected someone to have been able to demonstrate the same after 88,000 views and 6 years on a forum of English language aficionados.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/gkelt1
  • 1039

With "me" being a key part of the sentence, convention requires "to" to be used. Common sense tells us that, i.e., no "authority" other than plain, simple, common sense convention via everyday language.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/captaingarbonza

"Common sense" is just whether or not you, a native speaker, think you've heard it before, so it's pretty useless for evaluating dialects other than your own.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/b_adger

So someone needs to provide evidence that "The pharmacist recommended this medicine me" is not correct?

How about proof that "the pharmacist recommended this medicine to" is not correct or "pharmacist recommended this medicine to me"?

Any other random words you want to leave out because of lack of authority?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MarkFraser11

Yes, @chargeronthenet, the "me" is needed, because without it you change the meaning. In the French it is indicated that the recommendation was made to "me" (by using "m'a").

There is no context to indicate that the "me" is implied. She could have, for example, been recommending it to the general population. Only by including "me" do you resolve that question.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/roOodie

So, badger, you don't have any evidence either. Turning the discussion into a disrespectful attack is intellectual laziness as well as being mean.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MarkFraser11

Yes, they do. Given their apparent level of certainty it should be very easy to do so.

I never said that 'the pharmacist recommended to me....' (and variants) is not correct. That would be ridiculous.

Have you read any of this discussion?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Tom560480

In French some verbs take à, some take de, some take no preposition at all, and we're taught that each choice is right or wrong. English tends to be more versatile, there's no Academy laying down rules, one can play around. But conventionally one tends to hear "gave me" and "recommended to me." Prescriptivists tend to believe there's a rule there. I doubt it, but each form seems idomatic. That's how I'd say it.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/captaingarbonza

Given the wealth of English dialects and that very few of us speak all of them, yes, if you're going to state definitely that something is incorrect you should be able to it back up with something a bit better than "that's not how I would say it".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/chargeronthenet

The chemist suggested this medicine is quite sufficient, the french doesnt matter


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DianaM

"The French doesn't matter?" Curious remark. You are here to learn French, aren't you?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/chargeronthenet

We dont need proof it just plain sounds ❤❤❤❤❤❤❤❤❤


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/doublelingot

The pharmacist advised me this medication.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Black_Cherries

No, "advised me" has the same problem as "recommended me." It's a literal translation from the French, and it doesn't sound right in English. It should be as angelo said, "the pharmacist recommended this medicine to me." And "advised" would not be the right word in English. It should still be "recommended," unless you are going to translate thus: "The doctor advised me to take this medication."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Dave962976

" recommended this medication to me" was accepted October 2, 2020


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Valerie725142

But "to" is not available on the list of words.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DentDebbie

I completely agree


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Elaine365269

Absolutely..either include a "to" or miss out the "me"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/d0ctag

I agree too!!!! :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/effyleven

What? No! Let's not find faults where there are none, please.

"Recommended me.." is perfectly fine; nothing wrong with it at all. I have a friend who "recommends me" wine all the time... ...(although I wish he wouldn't. His tastes are much different to mine.)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Glenn755063

Does he also suggest you books? Some English verbs (like recommend and suggest) use a preposition with their indirect objects. Others (like give, offer, or show) don’t. “He recommended me the medicine” is understandable, but sounds foreign to native English speakers.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/captaingarbonza

If you read through this thread you'll see that the people who speak this way are native English speakers so it certainly doesn't sound foreign to them. Clearly it's uncommon where you're from but it isn't everywhere.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Glenn755063

I challenge you or anyone to find and provide a single example of the construction, “He recommended me something” in a written sample of edited, standard English.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Glenn755063

Okay, Captain Garbonza! I can’t argue with your source. I’m glad I didn’t bet any money!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/captaingarbonza

1985 OED: "1985 Times 8 Apr. 10/1 ‘Can you recommend me a nice hotel?’ I was asked"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/chargeronthenet

Can you recommend a nice hotel, sounds much better


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/chargeronthenet

Sp what, doesnt make it wrong


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DianaM

If you read, or even just skim, the lengthy comments here, you will see that many people have asserted positions on this. It does seem that the people who use "recommend" in this way [i.e., without "to"] are somewhat in the minority, but still a recognizable subgroup. Some do; most don't. I doubt we'll get very far attempting to change either camp.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/rgrindle1

If someone recommends YOU, it's for something for which YOU are suited; such as a job.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/chargeronthenet

I think your english is worse, in real life i would say the chemist suggested this medicine


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/blas_

I agree as well


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/cheesemom

Absolutely!!!!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/HelenBeck2

I agree with you.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MarkFraser11

This thread is a perfect example of how people on Duolingo give uneducated opinions based on only their own perceived experience. Not a single person cites any source to support the claim that the English is wrong.

For anyone that is actually interested in why this English is not incorrect, you can read the discussion here:

https://english.stackexchange.com/questions/285590/recommend-me-vs-recommend-to-me


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/philverschueten

Interesting. I have always thought the "to" was required


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DianaM

While the stackexchange discussion is interesting, I don't see anything in the way of "support" for the opinions stated there, other than the citations of Google Ngram, which is almost as useful as reading tea leaves. The "to" is required in most forms of English.

Edit - Here is some support, if you like, for my preceding sentence:
https://separatedbyacommonlanguage.blogspot.com/2007/12/she-gave-it-me.html


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MarkFraser11

I'm not sure that your citation is relevant as I don't think "give it me" is exactly analogous. To the extent that it is, the article does not conclude in any way that it is per se incorrect.

I appreciate the effort, but really if that's the best source you can come up with I am further convinced that the Duo answer above is not incorrect.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MarkFraser11

The citation is from a well-reasoned post by a well-reputed poster (top 0.30%) on a well-reputed site where people discuss English language and usage. The post leads to the conclusion that the "to" is not required.

I am still waiting for something that comes anywhere close to such a well-reasoned explanation presenting the opposite conclusion.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/roOodie

You won't get support from this crowd. Like you, I am frequently downvoted for statements that I back up with authoritative references. Unfortunately, we live in a time where people believe their limited experience must stand as the only "true" evidence for any issue. Hang in there!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/chargeronthenet

With the double negative you should be a politician or a reporter


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jojo553168

Or the pharmacist recommended me to this medicine.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DianaM

Nope, that is quite wrong in English. Unless you mean that the pharmacist was talking to the medicine.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/chrisbrown441096

Diana, a lingot for the laugh you gave me.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/N.Hilary

Agreed. Not a good translation. The pharmacist recommended this medicine to me.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/XgwJ4UVx

You cannot omit the "to" in this sentence in English. It is simply wrong without it.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/chargeronthenet

Leave out the "to me" and its good


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/XgwJ4UVx

Exactly. You recommend something "to" someone.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sandys

I agree, the English translation is awkward.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RJCurrier

Not just awkward, frankly wrong.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/chargeronthenet

No such thing as wrong translation, some are beyter than others, lets move on were getting bogged down with rubbish. The pharmacist recommended it...... Is all we need


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jenmiller001

Wrong translation! "the pharmacist recommended this medicine to me" as noted below is correct.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Kathryn484658

I agree. The English is poor.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/puppyboys2

It should say "to me", but the word "to" was not in the choices


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/kmargittai

"to me" or "for me" or omit the "me" completely!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Robynjean

I agree, a 'to' is necessary


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Patty13647

Keep reporting these errors. I'm reporting A LOT of mistakes on these new exercises. They are good about accepting the correct translations, so that's good.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ijmcleod

"Recommended me" is bad English.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Arron220

I am in agreement with everyone that the English in this sentence is awkward and not at all clear (at first it sounds like the pharmacist is recommending the person, rather than the medication). However, just as a point of interest, I used to work with a guy from Sheffield (UK) and this is EXACTLY how he would have phrased this kind of sentence! It was not necessarily 'correct', but quickly became very charming in fact, and he's certainly not the only person from the north of England who I've heard use this kind of construction. :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Black_Cherries

"at first it sounds like the pharmacist is recommending the person, rather than the medication"

That's the problem. Since Duolingo bases its teaching on translations back and forth between the two languages, they should use current standard English -- not sentences simply rendered literally from French. Right now, a lot of their French-to-English stuff looks like lazy and slipshod work.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Arron220

It is unfortunate that such a wonderful app, which has done so much good for the spread and popularity of languages, seems to have rushed out this new content, so much of which is incorrect. Direct translations from French to English which simply do not work are not a good look for the brand. I offered to be a volunteer moderator or check new content many months ago but have never had a response. In the meantime we can just continue to down-vote and report poor sentences, and suggest correct translations. Hopefully with time the sentences will improve. :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/chargeronthenet

Why should we value your input?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/tachyonashley123

Perhaps it's a British expression, then? I'm in the Southwest and i would say it, as well. Southwest dialects often share features with Northern ones.

I don't see how it's awkward or unclear. If i was the one being recommended and not the medicine, that would be "The pharmacist recommended me to the medicine". If you drop the "to" then the indirect object comes first.

"Buy me a drink", "You owe me a fiver", it's consistent.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/captaingarbonza

I grew up in New Zealand and don't find it awkward either and a lot of our older expressions are British (and/or Scottish) in origin so that's very possible.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/chargeronthenet

Shakespearan english is correct but we dont use it today, thank god


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/captaingarbonza

"Older" as in older origins (as opposed to more modern expressions that are more likely to be picked up from American TV shows than anything from the UK). They're still in regular use today and part of modern New Zealand English.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RichardGil10

Every country has uneducated people.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Arron220

Hi Richard, how are you?

Although you're right, there are various levels of education in each and every society, I think this is more of a case of how the language and use of vocabulary has developed in a particular region over a number of generations, rather than all of those people being uneducated. One of the most interesting things about English (or indeed any country) in my opinion, is the richness of the different regional accents and dialects. We can express things in many different ways, yet are (nearly) always able to understand each other! :)

Have a good day.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Black_Cherries

Aaron,

Another factor may be the age of the expression in question -- that is, the one you said people from northern England tend to use. I have found that a lot of stuff in French, if translated literally into English, sounds like something we ('modern') English speakers would have said a century or more ago. The people from northern England may be using a rather dated "regional" English, which is close to a literal translation from French. It's very likely just an older usage, left over from the early 20th century or even the 1800s. It's not that they're uneducated -- they simply kept using the older expression, while the rest of the country did not.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Arron220

Hi Black Cherries, I'm in 100% agreement with you that these people are not uneducated! The guy I was talking about in my original comment was my boss so certainly no fool!

That's an interesting idea, that the construction perhaps derives from an older french and has remained in use in that region. Perhaps that's true.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/tachyonashley123

That would make sense, like how "thee" and "thou" stuck around in regional dialects for a lot longer than in the Southeast (and can still be heard occasionally in parts of Yorkshire, for example).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jeanalcock

...'this medicine to me' is now accepted


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Lasartreuse

Impossible to render this French sentence into acceptable English without a "to."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/chargeronthenet

Rubbish, the pharmacist recommended i take it


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/andywalter7

oh dear another clumsy translation


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DGZhl8

Better English would be " the pharmacist recommended this medicine to me"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PamelaVanW1

This is a very awkward English translation. We would say the pharmacist recommended this medicine to me. At the very worst... recomended to me... this medicine


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MarieCurie939565

In English this needs the preposition "to". The pharmacist recommended this medicine to me.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DianaM

That is certainly the only way I have ever heard it used, but, given the fact that more than one person in this discussion considers "recommended me" to be an unremarkable translation, we probably need to recognize that this is another of those regional variations that crop up from time to time.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DonaldLeBeau

The point here, for me, is to learn how things are expressed in French. That the English version (probably arrived at by a native French speaker with good but not perfect English) is of secondary concern. Yes, it's annoying to have a perfectly acceptable English translation rejected, but that's more a slightly wounded ego than anything, I would recommend though, TO the people at Duolingo, that they include as acceptable all the versions that various Duolingo members regard as acceptable.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MelindriaT

This translation is horrible English - it's beyond slang.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Glenn755063

The answer is not idiomatic English. You recommend something to someone. You do NOT recommend someone something. No English speaker of any dialect would ever frame a sentence like that.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DianaM

If you take the trouble to read the comments on this page, you will discover that there are indeed English speakers who use this form and who are, moreover, surprised that others are not familiar with it.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ThomasMurp695781

DianaM, I agree. While I am in the category of an area quite unfamiliar with it (Southern Ontario), I acknowledge the possibility and reports of it existing elsewhere. It's always amazing to me that other very well educated people cannot acknowledge this.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/chargeronthenet

The pharmacist advised me about this mediine, maybe because i had not taken it before and needed to know if taken with foof without food etc. We cant translate a songle sentence properly without context. Get over it everyone. No wonder wars start??


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Julian.Webb

The pharmacist recommended this medicine for me... Should also be allowed


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/chargeronthenet

Leave off the for me, not needed and sounds silly


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Barb312018

As a Canadian, if I heard someone say "The pharmacist recommended me this medication" , my first thought would be that the speaker was not an anglophone. We would say "to me" or "for me", according to the recipient of the advice (me or someone getting a medication fot me).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DianaM

Yes. If you read the comments (or even some of them!), you'll see that a lot of people agree with you, but it seems there are some pockets where native English speakers do speak this way. It was news to me, as well.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/chargeronthenet

It boils down to the fact that no translation is really wrong, just that some are better than others


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DianaM

Well....You can't really say that NO translation is wrong, haha. How about, as a translation for this sentence, "The dog barked"? And of course that is ridiculous, but once you concede that some just are wrong, then the question becomes where is the dividing line. Which is, I venture to say, what this entire conversation has been about.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/audiaphilios

"to" is still not available when the question is presented as individual words to put in order


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JoyceGee1

We in England, do not say recommended me! We say recommended for me.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/captaingarbonza

This reddit thread has some interesting discussion (including a citation from the OED) and examples of this construction being used in books for centuries. I think some of the people complaining about it have probably encountered it themselves and are maybe overthinking the awkwardness that comes from the sentence being rather contrived and misinterpreting it as incorrect grammar.

https://www.reddit.com/r/grammar/comments/14yizf/recommend_me_a_good_book_is_that_wrong/


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ak3N1y

Agreed that the English translation should be "recommended this medication to me".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/EstherRube

Needs to be "to me"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/chargeronthenet

Dont need the to me. The pharmacist recommended this medicine is enough, to me is implied


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Gillian82776

recommend someone for, recommend something to


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/B.Ellis

Lots of contradictory posts here. When I'm in doubt I ask my cousin who is an English professor who also studied French. She says that it should translate ''recommend this medicine to me.'' Leaving out the ''to'' is grammatically incorrect. Alternately one could omit the implied ''me''


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/chargeronthenet

Good to see someone with common sense, i agree 100%.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/gsbduo
  • 2289

I think this is an example of where British English usage differs from American usage. The OED gives the following example: “Can you recommend me a nice hotel?” Americans would not say that. We would say “Can you recommend to me a nice hotel.” Or perhaps, “Can you recommend a nice hotel to me.” But I suspect Brits would be fine with the “recommend me” form.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DianaM

Frankly, as a Canadian (who grew up in the States), I'd just say, “Can you recommend a nice hotel?” I guess that's another sidetrack altogether, ha.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MarkFraser11

It has nothing to do with British vs American. It only has to do with people making claims (that the English is wrong) that they cannot support.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/chargeronthenet

Dont need me, just can you recommend a good hotel, obviously its to me but dont need me or to me. It sounds stupid with me in it


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/chargeronthenet

We do not need the me or the to me, end of story, just the chemist recommended it.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MarkFraser11

Guess what: repeating yourself doesn't make it so. If you are going to keep replying, how about actually refuting the point being made?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/chargeronthenet

Sorry that you dont seem to be a full quid


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MarkFraser11

Ah yes, when all else fails, bring out the ad hominem. Well done.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/captaingarbonza

Get over it goose, move on to the next exercise in duolingo

Since you're the one who keeps coming back to complain about the suggested answer repeatedly with nothing to back it up, perhaps you should take your own advice.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/chargeronthenet

Get over it goose, move on to the next exercise in duolingo


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/chargeronthenet

Can you recommend a nice hotel, is all we need


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SueBernard

This is bad English. It should've been corrected by now.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Colin178883

This maybe a differences between American and English usage surely it should recommended this medicine to me is more natural


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Tweed903443

BAD ENGLISH. Totally incorrect use of "recommend".

This makes me so angry. All they have to do is simply hire a native English speaker - preferably an editor - to go through this. It's so totally unprofessional.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Chris833069

Thank goodness so many others noticed this.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Arron190

"The pharmacist advised me to take this medication" not accepted 18/1/21


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/chargeronthenet

Usually the doctor does the advising, the chemist just dispenses it


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/judycucin

TERRIBLE ENGLISH!!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MarkFraser11

Does anyone want to tell me that "The pharmacist gave me this medicine" is also "incorrect" English? If you do not think so, please tell me the difference between "[to] give" and "[to] recommend" in that context.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Tom560480

These matters are well discussed in previous comments. "The pharmacist recommended me this medicine" is perfectly grammatical but it is not conventional. It sounds a bit odd but no grammatical stricture forbids it. It has the whiff of regionality, "non-standard" someone said. The use or non-use of prepositions after various verbs, in French and in English, seems a bit arbitrary. In the US we "agree on a deal." Brits "agree a deal." Who's right? Everyone. Vive la difference.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MarkFraser11

You are the only person so far who has said that it is perfectly grammatical. I haven't even gone that far (yet). Although after doing further research I am now willing to say that it is.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Tom560480

The distinction's not grammatical, just habits of usage, custom, historical accident that can vary from place to place. With "give" we've learned to absorb the "to" into the verb, a kind of shorthand, though it's also fine to say "gave to me" ("I'll give to you this paper of pins"). Not so much with recommend, but you can drop the "to" if you like, nothing wrong with it, could start a trend.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/tachyonashley123

The trend already exists. Search "recommend me" in these very forums and you get posts reading "Recommend me French songs" and "Recommend me some French Youtubers" and "Recommend me other study materials".

I would definitely say "recommend me".

Would anyone here object to "Give me a minute", "Sing me a song", "Cry me a river", "Tell me a story", "Paint me a picture", "Sell me a car", etc.?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/tachyonashley123

@Roan866446 I'm not missing the point. I realize not all ditransitive verbs can be used that way, but in my experience (and i accept this may not be true in all dialects), "recommend" is one of the ones that can, and frequently is.

I would be surprised to hear "prove" or "demonstrate" used that way, and would not use them that way myself, although i would understand what was meant by it.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/chargeronthenet

Rubbish where i come from


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/chargeronthenet

Yes it sounds stupid, maybe ok in songs etc, but definitely not everyday english usage. No one sells me anything, i buy it rather.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/chargeronthenet

Il give to you this paper of pins is definitely not everyday usage, it sounds silly


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/chargeronthenet

Of course its not forbidden but it sounds stupid and definitely not everday usage


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/captaingarbonza

The only thing that sounds stupid here is your apparent obsession with repeating the same unsubstantiated opinion over and over again. We are well aware of your "it sounds stupid" stance towards other peoples' dialects. You're contributing nothing new to the discussion.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/chargeronthenet

If it were a battle of wits, you seem to be less than half prepared


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/chargeronthenet

It may be gramaticcaly correct but no native speaker would say that, making it "wrong"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/captaingarbonza

Maybe they don't where you're from but I've heard native speakers use that construction. I use it myself sometimes, usually in the question form (i.e. "can you recommend me a good book?")


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/chargeronthenet

Just because you use it doesnt make it righr, and the fact you may sometimes use it makes it further from right


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/captaingarbonza

Being regularly used by native speakers actually makes phrases incorrect in your opinion? What utterly fascinating nonsense.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/chargeronthenet

Can you recommend a good book? Do not need the me at all, makes it sound stupid


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/captaingarbonza

I didn't say you "need" the me, just that it's a construction that people use. There are a lot of different English dialects and a lot of different ways of saying the same thing. If your only argument is "it sounds stupid" then what you're really saying is it's not part of your particular dialect. That's fine, but it doesn't make it incorrect. There will be places in the world that think the way you speak sounds strange as well, but hopefully they'd be open minded enough not to refer to your speech as "stupid".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/chargeronthenet

Keep it simple stupid, the kiss principle. Leave the me out, end of story, otherwise you sound like a klutz


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/chargeronthenet

Just trying to improve your englisg so you dont sound like a wog. My english is fine, thanks


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/captaingarbonza

I'm a native speaker and have no interest in taking advice on how to speak my own language properly from someone who thinks "wog" is an appropriate word to use.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Tom560480

Écoute: We must stand as one against the abasers of language. Those who stutter at the gutter of utterance: Include me out. For the rest, answer me this: Is you is or is you ain't my baby?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DianaM

It's a perfectly grammatically correct sentence, but it isn't a translation of the French one.

The pharmacist recommended this medicine to me. - The pharmacist told me this was a good medicine.

The pharmacist gave me this medicine - The pharmacist handed me some medicine and said, "Here, this is for you".

"The pharmacist gave me this medicine." = "La pharmacienne m'a donné ce médicament."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MarkFraser11

Thanks but that has nothing to do with my question.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DianaM

Oh! I am intrigued. I thought I had answered your question quite thoroughly. Could you explain what else you were hoping to learn?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MarkFraser11

I'm not sure how else to explain it. There is a parade of people here saying "recommended me" is incorrect. I am asking those people if "gave me" is also incorrect. If not, then I am asking them to explain how they are different.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MarkFraser11

@chargeronthenet, The "me" is 100% needed because in the French the recipient of the recommendation is explicitly specified as "me". Without it, the recommendation could be a general one not directed at "me", which would be different from the French.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/chargeronthenet

Rubbish, the me is neither wanted nor needed in the english translation. If i say the chemist recommended the medicine it implies me, otherwise i would put in you, him her etc. Chuck the me out for better english


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/chargeronthenet

Rubbish, translation is about the english, not the french. Me is not needed because me is the person speaking and unless he was speaking about someone else, him her etc, the me is not wanted or needed


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/tachyonashley123

"Recommended" does not require "to" here to be understood, no rule of syntax mandates it, but we are accustomed to hearing it.

I, for one, am accustomed to hearing "recommend me [something]", and a little confused to find so many people amassed against me.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Tom560480

To DianaM: "Require" is inappropriate. There is no Académie Anglaise laying down rules, only what is customary and familiar. "Recommended" does not require "to" here to be understood, no rule of syntax mandates it, but we are accustomed to hearing it. If folks start dropping it for convenience, leaving "to" unstated but understood, as they have with "gave", it will become the norm. There is nothing incorrect about dropping it now. It's just a bit strange, a curious and kind of interesting variant. To me "agree a deal" sounds just as odd, but that's what the Brits say. Just a matter of habit, not requirement.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DianaM

Ah, sorry, my misunderstanding.

Not commenting on the correctness of your original premise, but I feel I should point out that logic is a feeble reed when debating points of language usage, and arguing from analogy similarly dubious. Just the fact that one verb does not require a preposition does not, in itself, support an argument that a different verb should function in a similar manner.

Prepositions, in particular, are capricious things. I am no polyglot, but all three of the languages with which I have any familiarity have some verbs that require one or another preposition and others that do not. I have not yet discerned any logical pattern to this.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/chargeronthenet

They are both poor translations to english


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/chargeronthenet

The chemist recommended this medication, end of story


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/chargeronthenet

You dont need me at all, the me is superfluous


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/chargeronthenet

A native speaker would not say either, so its wrong


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/chargeronthenet

Recommending it doesnt mean its good, it might have a higher profit margin etc


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/chargeronthenet

Please dont go back to the french, we are translating into english. Dont go back there


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/chargeronthenet

The only thing the chemist gave me was advice, i bought the medicine, so yes ot is most definitely wrong


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/tachyonashley123

It's a translation exercise. It doesn't have to be true, or likely.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/chargeronthenet

Give implies it is free, so no i dont agree with you


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/chargeronthenet

They are totally different


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BrianNixon310876

Very poor English - again


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Valerie725142

The problem is that we are being marked wrong for the English grammar. This is a French course! In the US, we say either "The pharmacist recommended this medicine to me" or "The pharmacist recommended this medicine." Only non-native speakers (English language learners) say "recommended me." If this statement were about being recommended for a job or award, then we would say "The person recommended me for the job (or award), but the pharmacist would not "recommend me" a medicine. Let's move on.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/chargeronthenet

Yes but a translation is about the good english, not the literal french which is bad english


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/chargeronthenet

I agree with you, we do not need or want the me or to me, end of story


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/john891770

In English, it would still be an accurate translation in the context of the pharmacy : "the pharmacist recommended me this"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/chargeronthenet

Not good english in my locale


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PattiGrego1

A native English speaker would never say it this way. It's either "this medicine to me" or just "this medicine."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/chargeronthenet

Yay well done, i agree fully, but to me is not needed


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/chargeronthenet

Good work, glad to see someone using a brain


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BillHughes11

I interpreted this to mean the pharmacist counseled me on the medicine, which I . I rarely ask a pharmacist for a recommendation, but any time I pick up a prescription, I am asked if I would like to consult with the pharmacist (i.e., how to take the medicine, any precautions or side effects). Therefore this seems like a reasonable translation.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/chargeronthenet

Consult with the chemist is not everyday usage


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jan65453

We don't say recommended me in English


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/basize56

I'm coming late to this discussion, but i will say that when it is an exercise with the word bank, but a word such as "to" or whatever word you think should be there isn't there, you have the option to type it out instead. I've done that successfully.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SamSuitt

Oh, grievous foul (not fowl), Duo! No one, but NO one in the entire English-speaking world would utter your translation. Abominable English. Drop the "me" or add a "to," but do not leave it this way.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DianaM

You wouldn't utter it, nor would I, nor, we are well advised, would chargeronthenet. However, if you read the comments, you will find that some people do, and are even surprised that others are critical. Check out comments from captaingarbonza, tachyonashley123, and MarkFraser11.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/chargeronthenet

No translation is wrong, just some are much better than others


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/chargeronthenet

There would be lots, remembering that 90% of people are stupid


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DianaM

Could we please retain some shreds of civility here?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KennethLyo4

Yes, "recommended to me" is right. I just wish I could speak French as well as Duo speaks English!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/chargeronthenet

Dont need the to me in english


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ian768564

In British English a pharmacist is known as a chemist. As in 'Boots the chemists' since Victorian days. DL marked me wrong for using it.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BinVwp

This translation is wrong. In English you don't say recommended me


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/chargeronthenet

He recommended me for the job?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/chargeronthenet

No translation is wrong, but some are better than others


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Glenn755063

A weirdly Orwellian comment.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/chargeronthenet

Speak english or french please


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/lauraelspeth1

This is terrible English!! It should be, the pharmacist recommend this medicine "to me." You can't "recommend me" anything.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/chargeronthenet

Yes i can recommend me, eg., if you are desirous of having sex, i recommend me. So there you can


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/lauraelspeth1

That's completely different. In your example, "me" is the direct object so you don't need a connecting word like "for" or "to." In the Duolingo example, "the medication" is the direct object and "me" is the indirect object so the sentence is incorrect without some kind of preposition before "me."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Emma988472

Yes, this is not grammatically correct


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Norman491209

Recommended this medicine to me in UK English. These last 2 units which are written in American English have amazed me with the large number of divergences between UK and US English!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DianaM

I usually recommend reading the thread to find out what has already been said about such points, but I realize that in this case, the thread is very long and highly repetitive, so let me summarize, if I may.

"...recommended me this medicine" is not an American construction. In all this debate, there are some few people who are quite familiar with the usage and, of those, the ones who identify their location refer to Sheffield, Southwestern England, and New Zealand. There is also a posted link to the OED with an example of this usage.

It is not a form that I use, or have ever heard or seen used, but it seems it does exist in some locations.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/rgrindle1

"Me," in this case, is an indirect object. When someone recommends ME, it means that I'm well suited for something; such as a job.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Lee772724

Agreed. Duo is wrong in this translation. Either make it "to me"or drop the "me"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Wjxh4

I was thinking that pharmacists advise about medicine so, "The pharmacist advised me about this medicine." When picking up some post-op medicine for my daughter I received a lot of advice about the medicines on the prescription.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DianaM

I believe that would require a preposition, possibly "sur" - "...m'a conseillé sur ce médicament", to reflect the difference between recommending and advising about. I think we'd need a francophone to say for sure.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/chargeronthenet

We dont need to change the french, we are translating what is there to english


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DianaM

Well, yes. I believe, for the translation proposed by Wjxh4 to be correct, the French would need to be different. That was the point of my post.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/chargeronthenet

Noits not a literal translation word for word, no


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/chargeronthenet

The french does not need to be different to have a different translation eg je mange can mean i eat or i am eating and does not need other words in french to change from one meaning to the other. Rather it is down to the skill or lack thereof of the translator


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/captaingarbonza

She's not saying that any different sentence that you care to pick requires a different translation but that this particular one does, so your example is completely irrelevant.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/chargeronthenet

The francophone has already written, we just need anglofone to translate to good english


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/chargeronthenet

I dont agree, a translation is made to sound right in the new language regardless of what the french says, it should not be a word for word literal translation. Eg je me lave in english is i am having a wash, we do not say myself in the english


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/chargeronthenet

A translation is about the english, nothing to do with the french


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DianaM

What an odd thing to say. How can a translation have "nothing to do with" one of the languages involved?

I should have thought it reasonable to suppose that an understanding of both the direct meaning and the connotations of the French is pretty much central to a proper rendering of it into English.

It's all very well to produce a well-constructed English sentence, but one does need to ask if it accurately reflects the meaning of the French original.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/chargeronthenet

Of course it has to convey the same meaning, but it needs to look right in the to language not the from language ie we totally lose the french structure when the english translation is made. Word for word translation is wrong and looks stupid as well.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DianaM

I do not disagree with that. But "advised about" is not the same as "recommended", and I don't believe the same French will stretch to cover both meanings.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/chargeronthenet

Rubbish, translations are not word for word literal, but meant to convey the overall story how it is said normally in the language being translated into


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/chargeronthenet

We need to know context to be able to work out whether the prarmacist or the doctor actually recommended it


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/chargeronthenet

The chemist recommended this medicine, end of story


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/krystal745067

This is not a good translation..i agree with many others who have left a comment here...me should excluded completely or at most the last word of the sentence


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JoanneDela8

I agree with the previous comments.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KateMcCabe4

No English speaking person would ever say this. The pharmacist advised me about this medicine should be accepted.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MarkFraser11

No, it shouldn't. Your sentence would apply even if the pharmacist had advised you not to take the medicine. That is the opposite of the meaning that the French in this question is conveying.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/chargeronthenet

No translation is wrong, just some are better than others

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