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  5. "Il n'y a ni huile ni vinaigr…

"Il n'y a ni huile ni vinaigre dans la sauce ?"

Translation:There isn't either oil or vinegar in the sauce?

June 27, 2020

51 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/skfl5
  • 1844

I would say ' there is neither oil nor vinegar in the sauce?'


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/M9VG3LiA

I agree. I would always use neither ... nor. There isn’t either sounds completely wrong to me.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RowenaJane

What they wrote is a statement not a question so why the question mark?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/to-mor

The question mark indicates that it is a question in writing. When spoken the upward inflexion on the last word indicates a question in speech.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PeterRobin153588

There isn't any oil or vinegar in the sauce? Or many other possibilities except the given. The last five or six exercises have all given answers with bad English!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AndersAxmark

Please review English standard usage or either or, neither nor. The answers that Duo insists on for this section are not English and do not make sense


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Tweed903443

Just for those who are studying English..... this translation is pretty awkward English. We would very likely say "There is neither oil nor vinegar in the sauce." In fact, back when I was first learning French, it was helpful for me to think of Neither/Nor and Ni/Ni - easier to remember.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/b_adger

Actually, since this is a question, this is probably the only phrase where "either...or" would be appropriate:

"Is there either oil or vinegar in the sauce?" as the questioner actually wants to know if either of them are present, not if both are present.

Of course, this translation is only accepted as a typo for the incorrect "Is there neither oil or vinegar in the sauce?"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/kih37q4

"Is there either oil or vinegar in the sauce?"

A more accurate translation is, "Is there no oil or vinegar in the sauce?" or "Is there neither oil nor vinegar in the sauce?"

"Is there either oil or vinegar in the sauce?" would be rendered as "Il y a de l'huile ou du vinaigre dans la sauce?"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/rgrindle1

The way duo translates into English, a native English speaker might be induced to ask, "So which is in the sauce, oil or vinegar ." If "neither (one)" is in the sauce, then use neither/nor. If "either (one)" is in the sauce, but not both, then use either/or. (N)either/-for both. Either/+ for one of the two.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/to-mor

Duo still refuses to accept "Isn't there either... "as the form of the question.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/b_adger

This is as expected, the correct form of the question would be "Is there either..."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/to-mor

Well perhaps "is there neither" but my point is really that duo here and elsewhere only accepts the positive statement with a question mark which is the French way of asking a question rather than the English inversion.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GraemeSarg

No, "Is there either …" is incorrect. The correct form is "Is there neither oil nor vinegar in the sauce?".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/rleh
  • 1008

The whole section on "ni" is really tortured English. Perhaps someone should rethink how to present this? These almost direct translations from French into English don't work. The sentence above might more realistically be "There's neither oil nor vinegar in the sauce." or using part of the above sentence, "There isn't any oil or vinegar in the sauce?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/bvickz

They're very confused on the "either" structures in all of these exercises. They think "not VERB either A or B" = "not VERB A nor VERB B" but in fact it = "not VERB A or not VERB B".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/rgrindle1

We've got a little algebra going on here. Problem is; a lot of people don't understand algebra. Perhaps if you used parenthesis...?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/bvickz

“Does not like either A or B”

NOT(VERB(A or B)) = NOT(VERB A or VERB B) = NOT VERB A or NOT VERB B


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/rgrindle1

(Neither/nor) = -, and is correct. (Either/or)= +, and is correct. (Either/nor) is indeterminate, and is Incorrect. (Neither/or) is indeterminate and is incorrect.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BruceWater2

Unnecessarily complicated translation. I agree with skfl5's interpretation.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/FredMalakoff

This is ( another ) sentence that doesn't map onto reality in any way.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mmal190080

why do they keep doing this unidiomatic "either or" translation like 50000 times???


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Todd981655

Can someone please explain why is it "ni huile ni vinaigre" and other sentences make you put an article as in "ni le miel ni la confiture"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ann504636

My question is the same as Todd981655's. What happened to the articles here?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GraemeSarg

Only definite articles are required after "ni". Indefinite or partitive articles are not necessary.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AnneSt.John

I just entered the same response as did you, skfl5, and it was not accepted as correct, which it is, of course. It may be a more formal way of speaking, but it is certainly correct (References: the style manuals of both the CBC (Canada's national and top-notch radio and TV broadcaster - download the free CBC Listen app) and The Globe and Mail (Toronto-based national newspaper), as well as the fabulous grammar tome "Eats Shoots and Leaves".)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/to-mor

You might also like Gyles Brandreth's " Have You Eaten Grandma?". As well as humorous advice on grammar and punctuation he devotes some time to the differences between UK and US English


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/rgrindle1

Ha, Ha! Though I think the simple remedy for that particular title is a comma!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ToWiK

Duo, you're not translating this ni ... ni form into English as many people speak it.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/rgrindle1

So; which is in the sauce; oil or vinegar?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Gord543537

I'd say the person asking this question is asking with astonishment and/or disbelief, "There is NEITHER oil NOR vinegar in the sauce?" Duo's translation is incorrect asking if one of either oil or vinegar is not in the sauce. Ni/ni means neither/nor, nothing less and nothing more.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Lisaskier

I'm with everyone else, Duo is making a total hash of translating "Ni...ni...." into English.

Plus, this sentence is a question [not a statement ] as indicated by the question mark at the end.

It's too time-consuming having to improve upon/correct Duos translations as well trying to learn the French language.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Richard556716

Neither...nor please, either...or doesn't work. Fix this whole section please!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/wendalli

In english; neither-nor, either-or


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jeanv

There is neither oil nor vinegar in the sauce, -suits me better!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GraemeSarg

Or better yet: "Is there neither oil nor vinegar in the sauce?".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/gary.mackay

Awkward translation


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jayliz104

That doesn't sound right. I put ''Isn't there oil or vinegar in the sauce?' and I was wrong?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/b_adger

Jayliz, You are correct that the given translation is wrong. But ''Isn't there oil or vinegar in the sauce?' should be "Is there oil or vinegar in the sauce".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Flanders1

The word bank is so wrong! - The only option is 'isn't either" which is terrible English, at least in Australia..


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Gord543537

It's terrible English everywhere. You have to wonder what qualifications the people at Duo have that allow them to compose such trash.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Flanders1

yes it's very sad. But like you, I will keep going.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sergey629927

What's wrong with" Is there neither...nor..."?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TedLandres

Holy moley! I just couldn't understand this sentence's audio.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/geoff8407

'Isn't there either ' and 'There isn't either ' are surely the same meaning, aren't they?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/rgrindle1

I think both are grammatically incorrect.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Todd981655

Can someone please explain why this is "ni huile ni vinaigre" and other exercises make you put an article as in "ni le miel ni la confiture"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GraemeSarg

Because "ni" effectively acts as an indefinite determiner. If the items are specific then a definite article is required.

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