"Essaie de ne pas casser la vaisselle chez ta tante."

Translation:Try to not break the dishes at your aunt's place.

June 27, 2020

22 Comments
This discussion is locked.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Lee_with_2_Es

"Try not to break" sounds more natural than "try to not break."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Antti546484

This is like some poetry. The "essaie de ne pas casser la vaisselle chez ta tante" is my new favorite sentence.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/cambyrd

Try not to break the dishes at your aunt's house was not accepted.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/STRADS1551

"Try not to break..." is accepted now. 11 Sept 2020


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Felixs405

Not yet as 12/4/21


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/d0ctag

Neither was "Try not to break the dishes at your aunt's"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/doublelingot

try not to break the dishes at your aunt's place is accepted


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/--Roody--

That's because my aunt lives in an apartment, not a house.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/revles

However 'try not to break the crockery at your aunt's house' was accepted.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ketty945292

Why is la vaisselle translate to the dishes not the dish


[deactivated user]

    La vaiselle means dishes as in crockery; there is no singular in either language. One dish in French is "un plat".


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Alonzo1944

    For whatever it is worth, according to Reverso Conjugation, Essayer has two variants in the conjugation of Present Indicative, Future Indicative, Present Conditional and Imperative (Command) tenses so that "Essaye de ne pas casser la vaisselle chez la tante" would also be applicable.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/champguy

    Why not the china as translation for la vaisselle?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/tachyonashley123

    I guess they may not be made from china?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/tachyonashley123

    Hey everyone, quick show of hands: who here calls cups and glasses "dishes"?

    That totally stumped me first time around. You know, the multiple choice where it asks you to define "vaisselle"? I thought it couldn't be "dishes".

    (I have heard of "doing the dishes", but to me that's a synecdoche.)


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/UmaObasi

    My cousins warned me but Aunty was very nice to me. I broke many.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Lee795683

    "Try not to break the dishes at your auntie's place." Not accepted - I assume because of auntie - should be accepted.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Nathan173901

    aunt - tante

    auntie - tatie, tantine, tata


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Lee795683

    In English there is absolutely no distinction between Aunt and Auntie - other than geographic ones - eg Auntie tends to be used in the UK mostly.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Nathan173901

    I see, good to know. I assumed it was a diminutive form.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BrianBoru4

    Absolutely no distinction? Auntie is used by children or by adults when talking to children. As an adult there's no way I'd refer to my aunt as 'auntie' (or to my mother as 'mummy'). Reflected in French having different terms as well -- see Nathan173901 above.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Joanielovesjoe

    Try not to break sounds sarcastic or ironic, as if you are tempting them to do it anyway.

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