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  5. "Makea omena on punainen."

"Makea omena on punainen."

Translation:The sweet apple is red.

June 28, 2020

8 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/HulluNiilo

The dropdowns give this a translation. "A sweet apple (is red)"

So why isn't it accepted?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MrMalk

To my mind, although the Finnish can literally be translated as that, it doesn't entirely make sense in English. Saying "A sweet apple is red" makes it sound like a generic statement of fact. (An apple is sweet, therefore it is red; which is not necessarily true.) "THE sweet apple is red" applies to a specific apple, and to me at least, is a much more plausible sentence. Not that Duolingo is always very fussy about whether its sentences are plausible!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MrMalk

Can "makea" mean "fresh" in this context? I have heard "makea vesi" used as "fresh water", but there is an English term "sweet water" (as opposed to salt water) which could also be what is meant.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/lkthrj
  • 1417

No, makea never means fresh. It only means sweet, and is (or at least has been) also used in the sense of "sweet bike, man".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Tanberian

Salt water (sea) is suolainen vesi. Sweet water (lake/river) is makea vesi.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/FelishiaJu

Why it has to be "The sweet apple is red"?...

I put "Sweet apple is red" after all Finnish can be generic or specific depending on context, I thought it was a generic statement.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Hacu.

To me it would seem like, if using the definite article, the Finnish should state "Punainen omena on makea" (sweet describing a certain red apple), whereas "Makea omena on punainen" sounds like "A sweet apple is red" (red describing a sweet apple, in general).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/lisa687957

Ive never heard of sweet water in English.

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