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"Tú pruebas la fresa."

Translation:You taste the strawberry.

5 years ago

51 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/Synthpopalooza
Synthpopalooza
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Easy way to remember this: It's a cognate for the English word "probe", which comes from the same Latin root.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/irdevonk

Oh, that is helpful. So "He [metaphorically probes the idea of] a strawberry. Thank you!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JerryKness
JerryKness
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"Tú pruebas la fresa." (You taste the strawberry) Question: Is there a rule about using the accent with the "tú"? It seems we sometimes use it and sometimes we don't. Is it always used when at the beginning of a sentence?

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MariaSchramm

Tú - You

Tu- Your

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RMHaney02

Thank you so much!! I was getting some wrong and I didn't know why, thanks!!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/IronMaidenRules

Just a heads up in case you didn't know, if you click the "tips and notes" before each lesson they explain some things like tu with and without an accent mark.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/57flora

Unfortunately phone ap has no lesson explanation button

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MariaSchramm

It's a way to differentiating the words (Tú)You and (Tu)Your. They are not always used at the beginning of a sentence: Exemple: ¿Qué recuerdas de cuando tú tenías la edad que tus niños tienen ahora? - What do you remember about being the age your children are now? / Él no es tu amigo. - He is not your friend. http://www.linguee.com/english-spanish/search?source=auto&;query=t%FA

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/sguthrie1

Yes, always use the accent (Tú) when it is the subject (which is usually near the beginning of the sentence).

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lucrezia-luna

cual es la diferencia entre probar y tratar ?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/alohavale

Tratar is trying to do something, "probar" is tasting it

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lucrezia-luna

mil gracias :)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/sguthrie1

"Probar" is also to "try on" something, e.g., clothes.

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/marcy65brown
marcy65brown
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It's probarse.

4 days ago

https://www.duolingo.com/dashkkk
dashkkk
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just hate to spell strawberry... so much longer than fresa...

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/janway

Here in Uruguay strawberry is frutilla.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Airsoft246
Airsoft246
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So if I said "prueba la fresa" to someone because I wanted them to eat a strawberry, would that make just as much sense if not more than "you try the strawberry"?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/alohavale

The right explanation to "pruebe la fresa" is "try the strawberry" so you would be saying the right thing

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/sguthrie1

Remember that "Tú pruebas la fresa." can also be translated as "You are trying the strawberry." This would probably be a better translation.

See these references:https://www.spanishdict.com/guide/spanish-present-tense-forms/ https://studyspanish.com/grammar/lessons/regverb1 https://www.curso-ingles.com/aprender/cursos/nivel-basico/verb-tenses-present/present-continuous

.

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/sguthrie1

Yes, but that would require the imperative conjugation. Here are some handouts on imperatives:

http://www.spanishdict.com/topics/show/113 https://www.spanishdict.com/guide/formal-affirmative-and-negative-commands/

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/I_Am_Norah

I was told that "Prueba" was quiz...Is there a dual meaning?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/bholmes4

"You try the strawberry" does not sound correct at all. English speakers do not talk like that.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Roger_Burke

OK, so there is just one moldy strawberry left in the fridge. You are standing there as I open the door. I look at the strawberry then say, "You try the strawberry."

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RichardCro901145

But that would be a command. This is not in the command form, so it seems it would be more like, "You are trying the strawberry."

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lynettemcw
lynettemcw
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In the real world your translation would be accurate. But in Duo's courses in languages that have a present progressive tense like Spanish, Duo limits the present progressive translation to translating the Spanish present progressive. There are a couple of exceptions where the lack of the progressive in English would seem especially strange, but for the most part it is tense for tense. But you were incorrect in your response to Roger's answer. You try the strawberry is not the imperative mood. It is the indicative mood. The English imperative is marked by the lack of the subject pronoun and the use of the infinitive root (the infinitive without to). Obviously for most verbs, the infinitive root is the same as the you firm conjugation, so you only notice the latter in commands like Be quiet. So the English imperative here would be Try/taste the strawberry. You try the strawberry is present indicative and one of the answers Duo is looking for. The other one is You taste the strawberry. Actually translating into the present tense here makes some sense as it is often used for narration. So one scenario might be this narrative. You taste the strawberry. Suddenly a look of disgust comes over your face. I have no idea where I am going with the story, but you get the picture.

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/marcy65brown
marcy65brown
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No, Roger_Burke's " You try the strawberry" was clearly a command, using "you" as emphasis. RichardCro is right in saying that in that example it would be the imperative.

I think as you move through the new Spanish tree, you'll notice that the days of translating tense for tense between present and present progressive are over. There are many, many examples where Duo gives a Spanish sentence in the present and translates it in the present progressive. It caused quite a flood of questions/complaints at first, but I think now it feels more natural.

4 days ago

https://www.duolingo.com/marcy65brown
marcy65brown
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RichardCro, "You are trying the strawberry" was accepted for me 8/13/18.

4 days ago

https://www.duolingo.com/pingshaya

Yes, in English, this is more often than not an imperative sentence, meaning the subject would be removed because the subject is understood. For example, a fruit vendor might say to a curious customer "Try the strawberry". It should be an acceptable translation.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/k3nd0
k3nd0
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No, this isn't an imperative sentence. Imperative verbs are conjugated differently in Spanish. I think the imperative conjugation for Tú is "prueba" not "pruebas."

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Roger_Burke

I took my first Spanish lessons at a military school so there was a lot of IMPERATIVE going around. Our instructor was a Col. Infante from Madrid. The class had to stand at attention until ordered to sit. The order was "Sientense ustedes!" but for some reason I don't think I can say "Pruebense ustedes!" or can I?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/k3nd0
k3nd0
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Of course we do. It may be an unusual tense, but that doesn't mean it's wrong.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/sguthrie1

See my comment above on translating it as the English progressive tense.

3 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/zvasas
zvasas
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Why "check" is not good? (I am not a native English speaker)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/McMiestie

"To check" seems like something you do with your eyes or hands, not your mouth. The context ("strawberry") makes me think "try" (and NOT "check").

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/zvasas
zvasas
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Gracias.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SeanBaker1973

"You're tasting the strawberry." should be accepted. Reporting 16 Dec 2017

8 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lynettemcw
lynettemcw
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Duo only accepts progressive tense translations to present tense sentences when there is no real way to sound natural in English without it (expressions like it is raining instead of it rains. This is the convention that allows Duo to control which tense it is drilling. It reserves the progressive tense translations for the Spanish progressive tense. In languages like French and German which have no progressive tense, however, the progressive is encouraged as a translation of the present. It isn't meant to indicate that the progressive isn't a valid translation for the present in many cases. The Spanish progressive is used much less frequently and only to emphasize the continuous action in the present. But the convention is necessary for Duo's program to remain stable

8 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Thomasepayne

Awww... dang. Now I understand. I'm used to drilling in German, and I was surprised it marked me wrong. How is the 'progressive tense' used, in Spanish? I have no idea.

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lynettemcw
lynettemcw
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The present progressive tense is used to emphasize that the action is ongoing. ¿Has tú leído el libro? Estoy leyendolo ahora mismo. It is formed with estar and the present participle, which is one of the verb forms which allows the attached object as I did in my example. You will also sometimes hear it for longer term projects. Están construyendo un rascacielos en el centro. They are building a skyscraper downtown. I suppose you have to consider all of the uses somewhat subjective as they probably say more about the speakers attitude toward the action than anything about the action itself. The present tense wouldn't be wrong in either case. The past progressive is somewhat more complex. We often use the past progressive to set the scene. In Spanish that is done by the imperfect as one of its three functions (set the scene, repetitive or routine actions in the past, actions in the past without clear beginning and ending points). But if what we would put in the past progressive is more central to the main point, the Spanish past progressive is likely to be used.

4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/joderita

I said "You sample the strawberry". Is that not more accurate than "taste", since it's synonymous with "test"?

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/wazzie
wazzie
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You taste or you try seems most correct. I think sample would more often be used when you have a bunch of food options, and try a bit of each one.

John went to the buffet and sampled every food they had

Mary sampled all the food for the wedding

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/joderita

Tom tastes the strawberries to see if they're ripe. He samples the strawberries.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MariaSchramm

Don't get me wrong but, I don't know give you a explanation about it because I've been studying english too. It seems right. I think Duolingo uses the most used words in its phrases, but sometimes not.

http://www.linguee.es/espanol-ingles/search?source=auto=probar+comida

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/CearaGoodnow

What is the plural and singular dinstinction for "fresa"

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/orbit720

Isn't 'you are trying the strawberries' correct as well?

I was seeing the connection between present tense and present continuous and tried 'are tasting' instead of just 'taste' and it wasn't accepted. I asked a Spanish speaking friend about it and she said it should be correct.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/alfalfa2
alfalfa2
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You are right. I always submit my answer as correct and, after a time, DL acknowledges it. I think they must do this about once a month. The present progressive is used far less in Spanish than in English.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/VinnyandWi

I got this wrong because I spelled strwberry on accident, THEN I got it wrong because I did: Do you taste the strawberry. Yeah like You taste the strawberry makes sense!

9 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/KristinChile

The audio does not have a slow version. Both play at the same speed.

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Poseidon427

omg i thought this said, "You taste like strawberries." '_'

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lynettemcw
lynettemcw
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No. Believe it or not one way to say that is using the verb saber Tú sabes a fresa. Or Tú gustas a fresa. Probar actually means to test as well as to taste. You use it to offer a sample of the food, not to talk about how the food tastes.

6 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Jeffrey855877
Jeffrey855877
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I've enough "strawberry" already. I've even begun to dislike strawberries because Duo makes me type this difficult word so much.

So I really, really wish Duo would use some other fruit. fresa is easy to type on a QWERTY keyboard, but "strawberry" is not. Even though the letters in fresa are all on the left hand, they flow easily. Not so with "strawberry", with all the letters except "y" done with the left hand in an awkward series of reaches, especially "awbe". "Berrry" = baya would be nice. Manzana is a little harder to type in Spanish, but is nowhere near "Strawberry". "Raspberry"= frambuesa is much easier in English, not that hard in Spanish. I don't think Duo could have picked a fruit more difficult to type in Spanish - and Duo keeps repeating it and repeating it and repeating.

Duo - please expand your roster of fruits. People eat more than strawberries and sometimes even apples.

4 months ago