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  5. "Suomi, suomi ja suomalainen"

"Suomi, suomi ja suomalainen"

Translation:Finland, the Finnish language, and a Finn

June 29, 2020

24 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/EvelinK3

Suomi, suomen kieli ja suomalainen.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/annika_a

Yup, also correct! Was this not accepted as an answer?

I think the point of this exercise is to show which of these words are capitalized in Finnish and which aren't.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Melzinha75

they don't care for it. they also don't care for punctuation, so it's probably just not what they expected


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sarah803697

Isn't "Finland, Finnish and Finnish" technically correct, here?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TheSnowKing

Maybe? I am just a beginner here, but I think "Finland, Finnish and a Finn" might be accepted.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/simon486678

In this context finnish (no article) is clearly "the finnish language) and should be accepted. Following that translation wirh a second "finnish" to indicate "a finnish person" would be ambiguous in english.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TimK77777

Actually, in a similar exercise, "Estonia Estonian and Estonian" was accepted as correct.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AnitaVandi2

"Suomalainen" can also mean "Finnish", but is not accepted in this sentence.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Martha94435

The second word sounds to me like /tsu-o-mi/, not /su-o-mi/. The first 'Suomi' definitely has an /s/, not a /ts/, but the second one is /ts/, no question about it. The third one is kind of halfway in between. Is this a common thing in Finnish, i.e. pronouncing S as /ts/ instead of /s/? If so, is it only with word-initial esses, or does it occur otherwise, too?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Hacu.

To me all of them sound like having a clear 's' at the beginning - as they should.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BarAdal3

This reminds me of kuusi (which has more than five meanings)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TheSnowKing

Only 5? Perhaps you should look up the words "run" or "set" in English.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/EnviroHoosk

I kept getting this wrong. I even copied and pasted and was wrong. But when i clicked I cant listen right now, it said the answer was " They will be back in an hour" so it has the wrong correct answer


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TheSnowKing

When you click on cannot listen, it disables the listening exercises for "an hour", but it counts by number of exercises completed based on when I have had to click that. Most likely, your problem was either capitalization or a typo you did not realize.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/pa1975

I suggest "Finland, the Finnish language and the Finnish people" may be also accepted.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Taurelve

Well, suomalainen is singular, and 'people' is plural. Maybe "the Finnish person", though perhaps that would be a better match for suomalainen ihminen.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Nokitok

It's easy to translate a Finnish sentence into English when you aren't restricted to some arbitrary list of accepted ways to say it. These are like walking on a mine field even for a native!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/David587678

My answer was correct


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TimuRay13

I can't type anything!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BogdanChap

The correct answer is "Suomi, suomea ja suomalainen"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Hacu.

Finnish / the Finnish language = suomi / suomen kieli

But if I want to say e.g. "I speak Finnish", that would be "(minä) Puhun suomea/ suomen kieltä" which has 'suomi' or 'kieli' in partitive form.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Aleppanen

That's what I learned. I was wondering what kind of sentence is: Finland, Finland, Finn


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Aleppanen

Noun suomea

Partitive singular form of suomi. Puhun suomea. I speak Finnish.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/annika_a

Yeah, but the English isn't "Finnish" here, but "the Finnish language". There is no partitive meaning.

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