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"I want to get rid of these old saucepans."

Translation:Je veux me débarrasser de ces vieilles casseroles.

June 29, 2020

11 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/david317145

switching the sound off: ant stand these stupid voices any more!!!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ben829591

To get rid of something is reflexive?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jojo553168

1) There are many french reflexive verbs that are not exactly something you do to yourself.

2) Here you need to look at what the word means exactly. Débarrasser means to rid or to clear (the floor, a room...), it means you get rid of the embarras (the clutter, the inconvenience), so se débarasser de quelque chose means something like to declutter oneself of something. I guess it's not the correct way to put in englsih, but I hope it makes some kind of sense...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GrahamNdP

You can "rid yourself of something" though... :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/angus390025

That's how I think of it as well. But it might not be necessary because not all pronominal verbs are reflexive verbs. I think this is one of those, specifically an idiomatic pronominal verb, since débarasser can exist also as a transitive verb without the pronoun. e.g., Je débarrasse ton frigo de la vieille nourriture.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Matty_R

Your example shows that it's just a regular transitive verb where the object is the thing that is losing something. Like all transitive verbs, it's reflexive when that object is yourself.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Pigslew

When I use "veux" they require "ai envie de" and vice versa. No consistency! Reporting again.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/warren4184

Can it not be casseroles vieilles ?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GrahamNdP

No: « vieux / vieilles » is one of the adjectives that always comes before the noun! :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Amir235407

Dont understand the gender...ces - masculine; vielles - feminine , no?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GrahamNdP

Not quite! :)

« ces » is plural masculine AND feminine! :)

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