"L'artiste est applaudi par le public qui l'adore."

Translation:The artist is applauded by the public who loves him.

June 29, 2020

21 Comments
This discussion is locked.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LenReed

British usage definitely treats collective nouns like this as plural: the public love. But this singular here sounds odd even to my American ear. Certainly the plural should be accepted.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/lollington

Maybe the audience is made up of poor sméagol's who loves him, their precious. They wants him.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RaymondBeu

The public is PLURAL in English!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LenReed

In U.K. English it is plural for sure. In American English people use both. I, an American, prefer the plural here but I wouldn't call the singular wrong.

Both should be accepted.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/hinoeuma

The English on these is a bit rocky. I would say have said "The artist is applauded by the public which loves him"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Black_Cherries

Agreed. It could also be "the public that loves him."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Gerry-H

Agreed. If "the public" is treated as a singular entity for purposes of conjugating the verb, then whatever it is, it is not a person. Therefore, "that," not "who." However, I would omit both "that" and "who." Many years of grad school--eliminate every word you can.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RaymondBeu

The English translation is incorrect. Public is a plural noun in English.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/rocks2stocks

This is a poorly structured sentence in English. I don't know about French.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ShubhamSurf

Can anyone explain why is it "l'adore" and not "lui adore"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/lulularosa

It is the difference between direct object and indirect object pronouns.

The third person direct object pronouns are le/la/les (him/her/them). The indirect ones are lui/leur (e.g. to him/to her/to them).

So "Je l'adore" = I love him/her;
and, "Je lui envoie mon amour" = I send my love to her (i.e. I send her my love).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Lee_with_2_Es

Feels like this sentence could use some punctuation.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JaffaCake100

Why is not "audience" instead of "public" not accepted? It's even one of the suggestions.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BarakSaltz

The artist is applauded by an adoring public. (possible translation)

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