"I have to go now; I'm letting you go."

Translation:Je dois y aller maintenant, je te laisse.

June 30, 2020

21 Comments
This discussion is locked.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Mhmd30

Is the "y" necessary?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TimmyKilminster

Yes, you include the y if you're not specifying the destination. It's like j'y vais, on y va.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Brian826478

I agree. I have to go there now. Where? If somewhere why not say where? It must be another of those quirky French idioms.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Alex247537

I have to go there now would be a better translation right? Or skip the "y" for this to be accurate?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/--Roody--

You must put a location (destination) after aller. The pronoun y stands in for the destination, which is not further specified.

It doesn't have to be translated because English doesn't require a destination after "go".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Mhmd30

I didn't know that thank you !


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/duncanski

elsewhere in this section duo translates I'm letting you go as: Je te laisse partir. why drop the 'partir' this time? some consistency would be good!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GraemeSarg

This time it's the speaker that's leaving, not the listener!

Adding "partir" would be confusion, not consistency.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sucy-en-Brie94

Je dois m'en aller maintenant, je te laisse. Accepted :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TwoBeersPlease

Same question as Mhmd30, Brian824678 and Alex247537.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JeanAugust222375

I will know I have succeeded in learning French when these sentences come naturally


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Seenoff

How could you correctly express the answer using "il faut" ?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GraemeSarg

"Il faut que j'y aille maintenant ; je te laisse."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TanyaBaiko1

Why can't maintenant go after je te laisse?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/--Roody--

A long (more than two syllables) adverb often goes to the end of the clause so it doesn't separate the two verbs as much.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GraemeSarg

"Maintenant" is already at the end of its clause.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GraemeSarg

Because that's not what the sentence says. "Maintenant" is in the first clause, not the second. He's going now, not letting him go now (according to him).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Bekir978479

...je te laisse aller ?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Dmitri47485

I don't understand "I have to go now; I'm letting you go." Is it one person speaking or two? If two, then it's something like "I have to go now / OK, go in peace." BUT if only one person is speaking, I would translate "Je dois y aller maintenant, je te laisse" as "I have to go now; [so] I'm leaving you (for a while)". Otherwise we have very strange meaning like "I have to go now; and you are not obliged to stay here and may go as well."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GraemeSarg

Or it's a phone call and he's telling the listener that he's going to end the call.

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