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"I have my wallet."

Translation:Tengo mi billetera.

4 years ago

39 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/Monroehodges

They gave "billetero" as an option so I chose that one and it marked me wrong. Im confused.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/CattleRustler

The popup hints are just that, out of context hints, not choices. When it comes to synonyms DL tends to be picky, especially when there are more direct translations. When direct translations are grammatically correct, go with them instead of synonyms/paraphrasing, you will be correct more often than not.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/arghratings
arghratings
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"Billetera" is (properly) accepted. "Billetero" isn't accepted because it is misspelled.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ona_n

Mi madre is a native speaker of Spanish y dice que 'billetero' doesn't exist

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/murraba
murrabaPlus
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Tengo is necessary for "I have."

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/sraseattle2000

Cartera is feminine, no? Why is it mi and not mia cartera?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mitaine56

sraseattle- mi is a possessive adjective : mi cartera. mi goes with an object or a noun, mi madre, mi hija. mía is also possessive but used as an indirec t object, esta falda es mía, which means mine, not my.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lierluis
lierluis
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That would be the Italian way. In Spanish, mi, tu, and su don't change with the gender of the noun. I believe only nuestro/nuestra does.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AdeleMoses

Tengo mi BILLETERA...

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/FcoJavier99

Usualmente utilizamos Wallet -> Billetera (de hombre) Purse -> Cartera (de mujer)

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/sssdiyemiyom

that was what I was lookıng for Gracias111

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RaghavBhan1

Why is it tengo mi and not mi tengo??

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Hacu.
Hacu.
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Because it's "my wallet"="mi cartera/billetera". Saying "mi tengo cartera/billetera"="my I have wallet" makes as little sense in Spanish as it does in English.

You might have confused the short-form possessive adjective [mi + noun] with the reflexive pronoun and structure [me + verb]. The reflexive pronoun is placed before the conjugated verb, whereas the short-form poss. adj. is placed before the noun they modify (and no definite or indefinite article is used).

Reflexive Pronoun + Verb

Me compré la billetera. 》I bought (to myself) the wallet.

Short-form Possessive Adjective

Compré mi billetera. 》I bought my wallet.

Long-form Possessive Adjective

Estas son las carteras mías. 》These are the wallets/purses of mine.

Possessive pronoun

La cartera es mía. 》The wallet/purse is mine.

Recipient: Prep. "Para" + Prepositional Pronoun

Está billetera, ¿es (un regalo) para mí ? 》This wallet, is it (a gift) for me?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Scozta
Scozta
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Why are some sentences "De mi, ella el" etc ie my son's crib was la cuna de él, but you can say mi cartera

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Hacu.
Hacu.
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This sentence uses [Short-form Possessive Adjective + Noun]. The poss. adjective is placed before the noun it's modifying, and the adj. must agree with the noun in number and gender - not with the possessor. With this structure the definite or indefinite articles aren't used (just like in English). Noun is always needed - it's "somebody's something".

mi ojo | mis ojos 》my eye | eyes

tu ojo | tus ojos 》your eye | eyes

su ojo | sus ojos 》his, her, its, (ud.) your eye | eyes

nuestro coche | nuestros coches 》masc. noun 》our car | cars

nuestra casa | nuestras casas 》fem. noun 》our house | houses

vuestro coche | vuestros coches 》masc. noun 》your car | cars

vuestra casa | vuestras casas 》fem. noun 》your house | houses

su hijo | sus hijos 》their, (uds.) your son (child) | sons (children)

Possession can also be indicated with [Prep. "De" + Prepositional Pronoun]. Here the noun/pronoun (what's possessed) is accompanied with an article (def. or indef.) and the possessor follows the object after the preposition (de). It's "a/the something of someone's". Otherwise the prepositional pronouns are the same than subject pronouns, except that [yo] becomes (notice the accent) and [tú] becomes ti.

▪ "Mi madre siempre habla de mí." 》"My mother always talks about me."

▪ "Esta es la cuna de mi hijo." 》"This is the crib of my son's." (This is my son's crib.)

▪ "¿Ella está una amiga de ti?" 》"Is she a friend of yours?" (Is she your friend?)

▪ "Ese es el coche nuevo de ella." 》"That is the new car of hers." (That is her new car.)

▪ "una fiesta de nosotros" 》"a party of ours" (our party)

▪ "la banda de vosotras" 》"the band of yours" (your band)

▪ "ese perro de ellos" 》"that dog of theirs" (their dog)

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JamesRodri20

Why not 'mis'?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/timstellmach

"Mis" is plural. There's only one wallet.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JamesRodri20

thank you

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/dshane.elder

¿"Billete" no es un palabra? Yo creo que aprendí esa en clase.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/arghratings
arghratings
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Billete is what you would put in a billetera (or a cartera). Billete de diez dolares = ten dollar bill.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mitaine56

dshane- es una palabra. for metro ticket, lottery ticket, train ticket and there are some others.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/nakiki01

Is monedero wrong?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/mitaine56

nakiki- It's more for coins.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/EneaBett

El bolsillo would be a quiet common word in Spain.. "Bolsa pequeña o cartera, generalmente de cuero o tela, que sirve para llevar monedas."

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/paulmexicodf

could someone explain why the reflexive form is not usable here "me tengo la cartera"

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ant885895
ant885895
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Paul,

Congratulations, you are using spanish logic but its still unclear that its your wallet.

Your idea does work to say "Me tengo la culpa" to mean "Its my fault."

The difference is you can't have somebody else's fault but you could have somebody else's wallet.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/paulmexicodf

Thanks Ant, yes you're are completely correct, however my question refers to the use of the reflexive form as possession, i am actually still struggling to the completely get to grips with this usage of this part of the form.

So tbh I may be missing your point, for which I apologize, if this is the case, but why not a possessive form where, for example I can use it when referring to say a shirt.

Is it because the verb is not a physical action, where say poner is, as in "Tú te pones el abrigo", I understand this structure, what I'm trying to understanding is. why not with tener, is it because there is no Tenerse, thus it is the non physical nature of the verb?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ant885895
ant885895
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Paul,

Tú te pones el abrigo isn't possesive. It doesn't absolutely establish whose coat it is. It means you put the coat on your body but it could be someone else's coat.

Me duele el dedo clearly establishes whose finger it is. I can only feel the pain in my finger not in anyone elses.

If you have a wallet it is possible it could be someone elses. But when there is not doubt, "mi" isn't used to say "my".

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/fcspatriciab

Why is "Tengo" first?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Hacu.
Hacu.
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[Tengo = I have] It's just natural that it's followed by what I have. They could switch places in poetry or lyrics for example, but otherwise it would be like "Yoda-talk": My wallet I have.".

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Kiara759022

Doesn't cartera mean purse?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Hacu.
Hacu.
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Yep, yet another case where we need a context for its specific meaning; without it [cartera] can be translated several ways (see below).

I had had an impression it only refers to those teeny tiny purses women often use with their evening gowns, or/and as accessories, that are sort of like big wallets in size/shape. However, its use doesn't seem to be tied to size or to a certain type of handbag, as it can be anything from wallet to purse, satchel, portfolio and briefcase.

http://www.spanishdict.com/translate/cartera

For definite meaning, especially in lack of context, [billetera] could be a better pick as it's less ambiguos - simply wallet and billfold.

http://www.spanishdict.com/translate/billetera

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DelanoM876

I learned "billete" for "wallet". Is this incorrect?

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JRoc93

Why is "Yo tengo mi cartera" not acceptable?

11 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/kenziegwenzie

Good cause you're paying

7 months ago