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"Are grandma and grandpa married?"

Translation:Ovatko mummo ja vaari naimisissa?

July 1, 2020

15 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ian507644

Why not iso-äiti


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/pieni_chilipalko

"Isoäiti" would be a good translation for "grandmother" but as it is more formal than e.g. "mummo", "mummi" or "mumma" it doesn't work here quite as well as the others.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ukkram

Grandpa is vaari and ukki


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Cris_Grey

Why not “mummi ja vaari”? I have never heard “mummo”. Is this a Duo mistake?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/annika_a

Both are common -- it all depends on the family. You might even use one for the maternal and the other for the paternal grandmother, to make the distinction. The same goes for vaari and ukki for grandfathers.

Mummo is also a more general word for (very) elderly lady, although whether it's a polite word to use for any old lady depends on the context.

The other ones (mummi, vaari, ukki) are not used as general words for old people, but specifically refer to family members.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/pieni_chilipalko

Yep, and there are plenty of others as well. My dad's parents were always "pappa" and "mummi", while my mum's parents are "ukki" and "mummo".

You either use "mummo", "vaari" etc. as is or include their names, in which case they are written (and said) as e.g. "Maija-mummo".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LiiMai

My dad's mother is 'mummu' and my mother's is 'mummi'


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SeasteadsOptions

My mom's Finnish mother was 'mummu'


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KristianKumpula

I've heard "mummo" plenty of times. Could be a matter of regional differences.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/linda790281

Grandpa is pappa also


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Judy621605

Why not onko when that is one of the words given.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/croco-anna

Could we get mummi and Ukki as accepted translations of grandma and grandpa?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Moo770465

I am wondering if 'naimisissa' is inessive, like kalassa or marjassa...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Taurelve

I believe it is, or came from, the inessive case of naiminen, which means 'getting married' or 'marriage'.

And naiminen is a verbal noun derived from the verb naida, which means 'to marry' with an accusative object.

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