1. Forum
  2. >
  3. Topic: Dutch
  4. >
  5. "De meisjes gaan naar jou toe…

"De meisjes gaan naar jou toe."

Translation:The girls go to you.

August 5, 2014

30 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mehranf95

what would be the meaning of "De meisjes gaan naar jou" ? what is the usage of "toe" in this sentence, when we have "naar" already, and I've seen in other sentences that "naar" can come by itself as well.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Bouquetm

Well, I'm a native speaker so I hope I'm able to clarify a bit this quite confusing subject. It is exactly the same as in English actually. When you want to stress the word 'to' in the sentence 'The girls come to you', you will automatically replace the word 'to' with 'towards', because it feels weird to put all the stress of the sentence on one tiny monosyllabic word. The same applies for 'naar', so we add a 'toe' to put the stress on. Other similar examples are 'bovenop' instead of 'op', 'binnenin' instead of 'in', 'uit ... weg' instead of 'uit', 'met ... mee' instead of 'met'. The part we add does each time mean approximately the same thing as the original preposition (and so did the '-wards' in 'towards' too, originally). And then for the really eager students (because it gets quite complicated): the 'toe' is actually a slightly modified form of 'tot' (which can also often be translated as 'to' so is quite similar in meaning). I don't know if you learned this already but this is the modified form we use in the words 'ertoe'/'daartoe'/'hiertoe' which always replace 'tot het'/'tot dat'/'tot dit'. Other such modified forms are 'ermee' instead of 'met het', 'ervandaan' instead of '(weg) van het', 'erheen' instead of 'naar het' OR 'ernaartoe' in. And that brings us back to where we started. :-)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/hedi76
  • 1525

It helped me a lot, thanks.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GirlEinstein_Duo

This was so easy for me to understand I actually get it now! Bedankt! <3


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SokratisMp

you are awesome...thanks bro


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/nSSn

From what I've read so far, theres some “separable” words or prepositions, in this case “toegaan” is one word different from “gaan”. The first one is just to “go”, while the second it's “going towards...”. Not sure why yet, but what happens with this verve here is that you have to break it and take the first part and leave it after the subject (“jou”). Theres other words like this one, for example “tussen” and “tussenin” and happens the same.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/beloeng

So what word are we splitting up here - naartoe or toegaan? If we compare to tussenin, I guess the word in use here is naartoe, since there is no verb in either of them? I am confused. What is the exact meaning of "naar" "toe", "naartoe" and "toegaan"? :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/NoNameHaveI

Would like an answer to thıs—anyone?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PaCa826187

The girls go to you? Nice em dash, by the way.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/EthanGraha2

Google translate seems to think adding 'toe' just changes the meaning from "...to you" without the 'toe' to "...towards you" with it.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/NiquoleTaryn

From what I have read before in sentences like these, the 'tow' goes with 'naar' to translate as towards. Other than that, I think its just to show another way to say it. :I


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/feyMorgaina

I don't think we ever say "The girls go to you" or even "The girls are going to you" in English, though both are grammatically correct. We might say "The girls are heading towards you" or "The girls are coming to you". (Contextually, I'm thinking of maybe if two people are on the phone. One person asks "Where are the girls?". The girls are in another car, so the other person replies "The girls are heading towards you.")


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/debrucenator

I agree. I think 'The girls are heading your way' would probably be a better translation.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PaCa826187

안녕하세요. When they have a problem, the girls go to you.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/debrucenator

PaCa826187, that would typically be komen:

De meisjes komen altijd naar jou toe als ze problemen hebben.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/beloeng

So what word are we splitting up here - naartoe or toegaan? If we compare to tussenin, I guess the word in use here is naartoe, since there is no verb in either of them? I am confused. What is the exact meaning of "naar" "toe", "naartoe" and "toegaan"? :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MentalPinball

According to one of my dictionaries:

Toe: to, towards

Toegaan: happen, grow

Naar: (as preposition) to, for, at, in, after, onto, from. As an adverb: along. There are also some meanings listed as an adjective.

Naartoe: to, towards, toward.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ehsan_Mehmed

What is the function of 'toe'?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/nSSn

I just answered before, so I'm just going to copy and paste: From what I've read so far, theres some “separable” words or prepositions, in this case “toegaan” is one word different from “gaan”. The first one is just to “go”, while the second it's “going towards...”. Not sure why yet, but what happens with this verve here is that you have to break it and take the first part and leave it after the subject (“jou”). Theres other words like this one, for example “tussen” and “tussenin” and they behave the same way.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ehsan_Mehmed

sorry, i didn't read your comment before. But, thanks for your explanation :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BOOIII

Can you just use gaantoe instead?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MentalPinball

I don't think so, that doesn't exist as just one word.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/IanRichardKang

I'm confuse a bit. Why should this sentence use "gaan" instead of "gaat"? The meaning is still the same though; 'to go' or 'is going to'. In other forum I found out that "gaat" only works for singular and "gaan" most suitable to use for plural subject, is it true (?)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Susande

You're right that gaat is used with the singular subjects jij, hij, zij and het and that gaan is used with all plural subjects. The latter is exactly what's happening here, de meisjes is plural.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/IanRichardKang

Owh .. Alright. Thank you so much :D


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/James_Hunt129

I thought "jou" was used for possession purposes? Why not just use jij/je?

Learn Dutch in just 5 minutes a day. For free.
Get started