1. Forum
  2. >
  3. Topic: Finnish
  4. >
  5. "Luulen, että on aika käydä s…

"Luulen, että on aika käydä saunassa."

Translation:I reckon that it is time to go to the sauna.

July 1, 2020

12 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TangoDeltaDelta

"go to the sauna" or "go in the sauna" or "go into the sauna" - we use all of those completely interchangeably in English in my family.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/crowdesign

In some families of Finnish decent, "go sauna" is used, echoing the grammar of the original Finnish.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ems747

I think should be accepted in all of these too


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MrMalk

I used "I think that it is time to visit the sauna". Think (luulen) and visit (käydä) are both given in the hints, is there any reason this should not be accepted?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TangoDeltaDelta

"I reckon that it is time to go in the sauna." should be accepted.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/crowdesign

I wrote "I suppose that it is time to go to the sauna." Which should have been accepted, but it was not. By the way, most people in northern and western US would most likely not use the word "reckon" as a thinking word. Use of the word "reckon" in most English dialects is not about simply thinking about something. It is about making a calculation. "The debts were reckoned" or, "He will get his reckoning" would both be correct uses of the word. The use of reckon in the sentence above would be very informal and even then only used in certain regions.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Greg664033

In Australia it is common to use reckon in that way.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Greg664033

We would say "go for a sauna" rather than "go to the sauna".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sarah803697

In English, an acceptable (even, more usual) alternative would be "I reckon it's time to go to the sauna." But can "Luulen" ever be used without "että" in this type of sentence?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KristianKumpula

What you're referring to is called a zero relativiser, and that isn't a thing in Finnish. There may be situations where it may seem otherwise, but those are situations where Finnish doesn't need even an unspoken relativiser, for instance in the translation of "I think (that)...", which would be "minusta..." or "minun mielestä(ni)...". Possessive suffixes, like the one I just put in parenthesis, are optional as long as the possessive pronoun in the same phrase hasn't been omitted.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sarah803697

Sorry - a lot of that flew right over my head! So, is the "että" more or less compulsory, then?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KristianKumpula

It's no less than compulsory.

Learn Finnish in just 5 minutes a day. For free.