"Je n'ajoute ni lait ni sucre dans ma tisane."

Translation:I don't add either milk or sugar to my herbal tea.

July 1, 2020

39 Comments
This discussion is locked.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/pinchebob

I would use "I add neither milk nor sugar to my herbal tea." Perhaps "I don't add either one, milk or sugar to my herbal tea." But please fix this lesson.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/aussie3931

'I add neither milk nor sugar' is how we would say this.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SeanMeaneyPL

Yes. Just like thr French. Why change it?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Merryjesltghzk

Changing it from "(negative) either... or" to "neither... nor"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ichewtinfoil

Echoing other comments - I would phrase this "I add neither milk nor sugar to my herbal tea".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Peter724589

Agreed. Better English if less of a transliteration.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/buffalump21

Please change the English in this to "neither"/"nor" .... for negatives ...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/kKXI31

The English is this app is sometimes terrible... Like in this lesson. Really... Find staff that are native English speakers...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Aidan424456

I suspect most (but not all) of the staff are native American speakers, and that many of them are under the delusion that they speak English.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Martyn413385

We tend not to use the verb "to add" when talking about milk and sugar in tea. We either take it with or without or have it with or without.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Abstractrealism

That must be a Briticism? In the US we'd definitely use "add" more often. Though there are definitely a lot of different ways of translating this they should accept but don't. They can be a bit literal at times, and then not at others.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/aussie3931

Some Australians use 'take' but mostly we use 'have'.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KateTwigg

I translated this as " I don't add milk or sugar to my tea", which is perfectly acceptable in English English!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LaGrandeDa1

Yes once again neither......nor is preferable


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Franl17

Oh mon dieu! Duo apprends l'anglais s'il te plaît


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Stick.to.it

I'm confused. Why isn't it "de la lait" and "du sucre" here?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/FloraCynthia2017

It is true that in English if it is in the negative we use neither and nor rather than either and or


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Aidan424456

Yes, normally in British English one would prefer to use "neither ... nor" rather than "not either ... nor". I can't speak for American English ; I'm pretty sure Australian English follows the British English usage.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Abstractrealism

We do in American English as well, though I've definitely heard people not, but I'd say that was mistaken.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/aussie3931

Yes, we would use'neither/nor'


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JoBorn1

neither nor in my herbal tea


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/rstrobach

Is it possible to say ". . . ni du lait ni du sucre . . ." ?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/YaPrGa

What is the difference in pronunciation of lait and le? For me it sounds the same


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Tassie_Gorilla

The vowel sound in "lait" is like the "e" in "neck". The vowel sound in "le" is like the "e" in "taken".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ArnoldCohe1

ni is translated as neither or either, so there is no reason not to translate this into correct English as many have already requested


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/tUFIfpFd

Does anyone actually add milk to herbal tea?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Aidan424456

Yes. Some people even deliberately choose a version of "milk" that doesn't come from cows, and a tea that has a low enough pH to cause that milk-not-milk to curdle, creating fascinating convection patterns. What - some people do it differently to you? But that is always true, for all values of "people", "it" and "you".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ZVRq4QL7

I agree with all these comments, it's a slippery slope to a double negative, which obscures meaning.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Geoff246946

Surely anyone would say, "I don't take either milk or sugar in my herbal tea".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Poiuytl

I think it is olainly wrong to use either or in these negative constructions. Either/or is only used to present two possible alternatives. Two impossible or unwanted alternatives are presented with neither/nor. This whole lesson is just confusing. Especially since it purports to be about food when it is actually about bad and illogical English (and snails).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Poiuytl

Sorry for deactivated soell check. Fat fingers.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/--Roody--

From a widely cited grammar reference:

"Whereas in English you have three ways to express the negation - not either… or / neither… nor… / not... or... - in French, you only use ne... ni... ni...

Duo is correctly using the first of these three options as the default.. The other two options are also accepted as equally valid.

So everyone is right!!!

https://french.kwiziq.com/revision/grammar/how-to-use-ne-ni-ni-neither-nor-negation

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