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  5. "Se on suomalainen murre."

"Se on suomalainen murre."

Translation:It is a Finnish dialect.

July 2, 2020

7 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/paxpaquin

How many Finnish dialects are there?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MCRmadness

Quite a many, actually! Had to do a little bit of googling and apparently we have 7 or 8 dialect groups that all then have sub-groups of dialects under them. Here's a very short and simple list of the Finnish dialect groups and sub-groups in English.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/IdanTene1

This might also be relevant - comparing the genes of modern Finns to the dialects and distributions in Finland.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/paxpaquin

Thanks! That is fascinating ... and a little bit intimidating :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Lassi492061

Murre (plural: murteet) is derived from the verb murtaa = to break. Therefore, murre has originally been used of those who speak in a different way than I do (and the others who with me spoke in a "correct" way); all the others "break" the language.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/IdanTene1

Interesting way to think about it; I think it's more along the lines of "to breal something into many pieces", as in "to fragment". Then its not as if others break the language, it's just different fragments of a whole - the Finnish language.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Lassi492061

This would be a more friendly way to think about the ethymology of the word "murre" (dialect): a language consists of broken pieces, sligthly different ways to speak.

Nevertheless, Finnish linguists mean like this: "Sana 'murre' olisi syytä kieltää. Niin kuin hyvin tiedetään, meillä puhutaan suomen murteista. Alun perin ”murre” tarkoitti sellaista puhumista, joka jollakin tavalla poikkesi ns. oikeasta kielestä. Puhuja siis ”mursi” eli jollakin tavalla rikkoi 'oikeaa' kieltä." (There would be reason to forbid the word 'murre'. As we know well, we speak about the "murteet" of the Finnish language. Originally 'murre' meant a way of speaking that in some respect deviated from the so called correct language. Thus, the speaker 'mursi' or broke the 'correct' language.) This is from an article by Lassi Koskela, published by the (Finnish) Research Institute of Domestic Languages.

A difficult feature of the Finnish language is how the stem changes, as we can see from the different forms: murre (dialect), murteet (dialects); murtaa (to break / breaks), murran (I break), mursin (I broke).

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