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"something more to drink"

Translation:lisää juotavaa

July 3, 2020

14 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/johnle2406

Is there a way to include 'jotain' in this kind of sentence?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PetteriUSA

That´s what I put in as well, I am not sure if it is indicated by the case or if adding the jotain adds additional meaning to this phrase or not.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/johnle2406

Same thought here :) Hoping to get an answer from a Finn


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MCRmadness

A Finn here! I actually had to think about this sentence quite a lot because I'm trying to figure what are they trying to say with the English one - it's yet again one of those situations where I understand the meaning but it's really hard to find Finnish words for it when thinking deeper. Things I find could fit this:

  • "Jotain/jotakin muuta juotavaa." = "Something else to drink."
  • "Lisää jotain/jotakin muuta juotavaa." = "More something else to drink."
  • "Lisää jotain/jotakin juotavaa." = "More something to drink."

So I'm not exactly sure if the English is trying to say that they need a bit more of the same drink, or that they need more to drink but not necessarily the same one. That also is what changes the way it gets translated into Finnish because I guess "something more" still is a bit different than "more something", right? But that way you can include the Finnish word on the phrase, but I'm not exactly sure if the meaning of the English phrase changes, then.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/garpike

So I'm not exactly sure if the English is trying to say that they need a bit more of the same drink, or that they need more to drink but not necessarily the same one.

It could be either according to context, although the former seems slightly more likely.
I can't think of any natural and concise way of differentiating between more of the same thing and more of something else in English. 'More something to drink' is not very natural-sounding English and is still ambiguous as to whether the drink is different.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Tanja804298

"Lisää jotain juotavaa". It is literally "more something to drink" but it is accepted.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MnumbKnuts

Sometimes i feel deceived by this app :( looks like we all tried "jotain" first


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ian400723

some more to drink would imply more of the same thing. Something else to drink would imply something different to drink. Something more to drink isn´t really good English (at least British English).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/keithdavis19

Jotain = something so why is it excluded


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/w3WLnVmI

Based on the patterns we have inferred from previous exercises, an English speaker would naturally expect "jotain" here. If there had been some preliminary instruction about the various phrasings, then we'd be forewarned. But there is, at this point, no such instruction.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/shekhar761266

if something is there why not jotain lisää


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CharlieSueH

Would "enemmän juotavaa" be a correct solution here or is it impossible to use "enemmän" here?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sarah803697

Hmm. As an experiment I put "lisää juotavaa" into Google Translate Finnish to English ... the result? "more to drink".

So then I swapped to English to Finnish and put in "something more to drink" ... which came out as "jotain juotavaa lisää" ... so putting the lisää last might be a solution?

Would any Finns approve that Google translation above "lisää juotavaa"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MCRmadness

No, Google Translator does good job at translating from Finnish but it translates into it very poorly. 'Lisää' at the end sounds very weird to me and as always, it's possible, but no one really says so. So I'd say "lisää jotain juotavaa" is the only way to say that, or by leaving "jotain" out completely.

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