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  5. "Limonadi on oranssia."

"Limonadi on oranssia."

Translation:The soda pop is orange.

July 4, 2020

21 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/IanWitham1

Limonadi on IRN BRU.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/HerraKallio

Why is oranssi in partitiivi here? Would it be correct to say "Limonadi on oranssi"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/John1069

See: https://people.uta.fi/~km56049/finnish/partreas.html Seems that in sentences that translate in English to "it is X," where X is an adjective, such adjectives are in the partitive.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/pieni_chilipalko

"Limonadi" is a mass noun, i.e. it cannot be counted, hence the partitive.

Limonadi on punaista.

Limonadipullo on punainen. (A soda bottle is countable -> the adjective is not in partitive but in nominative)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JustinAus

Why isn't 'lemonade' accepted as a valid translation of 'limonadi' here, but it is elsewhere?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GuilhermeML

It should be. I've just reported it.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/one_half_3544

Still not accepted. I reported again. 18-oct-2020


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ValerioRad3

Please remove "Soda pop" and put lemonade. It is so archaic.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/shriker-tam

I think the reason for using "soda pop" is that soda pop can only mean a fizzy sweet drink, regardless of what englush you speak. Lemonade however, is a fizzy drink in the UK but not in the US, in Canada they call all sweet fizzy drinks "pop", in some places all fizzy sweet drinks are "coke", in some they are all "soda", but in others "soda" is bubbly water...the regional variety for what to call this type of drink in English is huge. But soda pop is unambigous.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GiangBi124672

What is the difference between oranssi and oranssia, musta and mustaa?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/pieni_chilipalko

"Oranssi" and "musta" are the nominative (basic) forms of the words and "oranssia" and "mustaa" are these same words in partitive.

The partitive is used here (limonadi on oranssia, mämmi on mustaa) is because "limonadi" and "mämmi" are mass nouns, i.e. nouns that cannot be counted/nouns that can be divided.

A bit of a brutal example. If you have a dog (countable), and it loses a leg, you cannot say that the leg is a (one) dog too. But you can have several dogs, e.g. two dogs. With e.g. sugar (mass noun), you can't have "two sugars", just two spoonfuls of sugar for instance, but if you remove some sugar from a pile of sugar, both the pile and the bit you removed are still sugar.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Stefan86239

Why dis they add an 'a' here to oranssi? I noticed they added the 'a' to the end of multiple words is it some kind of article or participle?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/John1069

See: https://people.uta.fi/~km56049/finnish/partreas.html Seems that in sentences that translate in English to "it is X," where X is an adjective, such adjectives are often in the partitive grammatical case.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SubtleRevulsion

"Who loves orange soda..."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jeffrey136200

"limonadi on oranssia". Does this mean the drink is the flavour orange or the colour orange?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/IanWitham1

If you click on the circle with three dots in it at the top of the screen, you will find that Duo has a dictionary. I did that and it told me that "orange" is English for "oranssi", so I would think it can be either.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jeffrey136200

Thanks for the reply. I use the Android app so, as far as I can see, I don't have the luxury of three dots or a dictionary. I was just being curious.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ystfan

"oranssi" only refers to the colour, the fruit (and so flavour) is "appelsiini". The course does later teach this, but probably the dictionary entry should be clarified


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Lezgian

got a wrong because forgot article the

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