"Monsieur Dumas vient d'arriver, je vous le passe."

Translation:Mr. Dumas has just arrived; I'm putting him on for you.

July 4, 2020

46 Comments
This discussion is locked.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Angela887963

I'm a native English speaker and I had to check the discussion because I had no idea what this sentence could possibly mean.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MajBren

moi non plus


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/pom666
  • 1353

In France, the Doulingo's sentence (in French) is used every day ....and several times a day !


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ClareKwan

I guess in France they use "putting 'him' on" for a person or a thing like a phone call? Mr. Dumas is a person, not a phone call, correct?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/pom666
  • 1353

we say : "je te passe ton livre" or "la boîte est à côté de moi, je te la passe, " or "c'est ta soeur au téléphone, je te la passe".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Patty13647

"I'll put you through to him" would be a better translation.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Vic3141

Even just - "I'll put you through"


[deactivated user]

    Or - "I'll transfer your call (to him / to his office)."


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Vic3141

    "I'm connecting you."


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ClaireGilbert

    This is just not said in English


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/waakak

    this is not how anyone talks, like others I had to click into the discussion to see what the English sentence even means


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GraemeSarg

    It's standard movie/tv dialogue, so it's based on how a lot of people talk.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LorraineMa991360

    Not in any movie I've ever watched. To "put" someone "on" to a person, means to disclose an activiy, usually sneaky or illegal.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GraemeSarg

    My guess is that you mostly (or only) watch American movies.

    "Put someone onto/on to" is different to "put someone on", and the latter also has two different meanings.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Hilary802176

    Awful! Quite apart from the terrible grammar, why on earth would you put someone who has just arrived (at a place presumably) through (on the phone)? This is even worse than the "what do they expect to fish (meaning catch) sentences!


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CinnamonTe1

    Imagine the following. You had a phone call scheduled with Mr. Dumas for 9am. When you call, his assistant puts you on hold because he's not in the office yet. After 3 minutes, the assistant takes you off hold, explains he just came in, and transfers your call.

    I came across this sentence in the "phone call" skill. This is a very common scenario, especially in an office setting.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ClareKwan

    a phone call, I understand; however a person is not a "thing" that one passes around, in my mind.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Janet334659

    Mr Dumas has just arrived, I'm putting you through to him. Accepted


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Vic3141

    I'm with Janet


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/semaphoredm

    For this sentence to make any sense in English a context needs to be provided (such as that by M.parlange) Otherwise it's nonsense.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Nalupilot1

    Agreed, the cintext needs to be a lot more explicit: perhaps a picture of someone holding a phone with Mon. Dumas driving up in the background.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jennie269348

    This sentence reminds me of my first office job where I had to fill in for the receptionist while she had lunch. It was in 1971 and I loved using the plug in lines. We used to say putting you through now sir or madam. These days this sentence is completely out of date.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sucy-en-Brie94

    Mister Dumas has just arrived, i'll pass him to you. Accepted :)


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Tweed903443

    That's also a very weird way to say it, though. At least in American English.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GraemeSarg

    "… I'll pass you over to him." would be the normal expression in BritEng.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/YKbK1J

    Arriver for a phone call?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/M.parlange

    Monsieur Dumas has just arrived at his office where his secretary is speaking on the phone. She says "Monsieur Dumas vient d'arriver, je vous le passe


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Tweed903443

    This is a terrible English translation. Once again, Duo blew it.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Stuart788229

    Unless "Monsieur Dumas" is some sort of clothing accessory this must be the most bizarre translation yet (and there is plenty of competition!)


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Felix--

    "Tourne et retourne, comme ça !"


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/EpwZVHcc

    Oh dear, terrible English


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MikeM2222

    Huh? If he has arrived then he is physically present, so how does it make sense to put him on the phone?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GraemeSarg

    Err, so he can take your call?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/NicolaKoh1

    Monsieur Dumas just arrived; I'm putting him on for you-- not accepted (15/Jan/2021)


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/StephenBol8

    "Monsieur Dumas has just arrived, I am putting him on for you" marked wrong presumably for translating Monsieur Dumas as Monsieur Dumas. Strange I thought that was his name.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Gabb318_PHL

    Haha I was repeating the sentence out loud and realized how funny the name Dumas sounded lol.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Tony320891

    I agree with many in this forum, the English translation is just wrong! That is not what most English speakers would say!


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/VOTTENBERG

    J'ai abrégé Monsieur en M. Pourquoi est-ce mal ?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/djeff61

    My answer has been marked wrong for calling the gentleman Monsieur Dumas, rather than Mr. Both should be acceptable.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LorraineMa991360

    As the sentence is not addressed to Mr. Dumas, it shoul be "....... I'm putting him through." or I'll put him through to you."


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ros11585

    Putting him on to you or putting him through to you are much better translations


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rostellan

    Agreed! Or, putting you on to him or through to him would work just as well.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GraemeSarg

    "Putting you on to him" gives the impression of "setting you on to him".

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