1. Forum
  2. >
  3. Topic: Finnish
  4. >
  5. "Lehmät potkaisevat autoa."

"Lehmät potkaisevat autoa."

Translation:The cows kick the car.

July 4, 2020

17 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Minando2002

Why "The cows are kicking the car" is not accepted? I assume that both the simple and continuous form should be accepted in Finnish or am I wrong?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KristianKumpula

That would be "Lehmät potkivat autoa". The reason is the fact that "potkia" expresses continuous kicking that is not temporally confined, whereas "potkaista" (which is where "potkaisevat" is conjugated from) is a momentane verb, expressing one kick.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Riimususi

The Finnish sentence with the verb "potkaista" feels like a one time occurrence, they kick once and are done with it. "The cows are kicking" sounds like they keep kicking it for now; a continuous thing. This would be better translated with a different verb, "potkia": "lehmät potkivat autoa."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Janne_G_Pirinen

And then there's also "Lehmät potkiskelevat autoa". In this version the cows are maybe beginning to make a habit of kicking the car.

"Lehmät potkivat autoa" can also be happening either present, past or future. We Finns don't really care.

But then again "Lehmät potkaisevat autoa" can only happen now or in the future. If it happened in the past it would have been "Lehmät potkaisivat autoa".

Now you understand.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/pieni_chilipalko

"Potkiskella" also somewhat implies that this is a rather half-hearted effort. The kicks aren't hard, nor particularly well aimed.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ElleryAree

But why is "autoa" then? So far I understood that partitivi means an ongoing action?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Riimususi

They kick a part of the car, but most of it is left untouched, and after the kick the car is probably mostly ok. If you say "auton" here, that sounds like the car was kicked so hard it actually moved (and maybe the new location of the car needs to be specified), or they kick the car to a complete mess. "Lehmät potkaisevat auton kiertoradalle." (The cows kick the car to the orbit.) "Lehmät potkaisevat auton lunastuskuntoon." (The cows kick the car to an undrivable condition.)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KristianKumpula

In addition to targets of ongoing actions, partitive is also used for the targets of irresultative actions. I know it probably doesn't seem logical to think of kicking as irresultative, but it's irresultative because it isn't considered to have a state of completion. In order for it to have a state of completion, it needs to transform the object in some way. While kicking can do that, it isn't a necessary by-product of the completion of that action.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JamesTWils

Can it not be "a car"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Zzzzz...

Yes, it can. I've added it in the system now, but it will take a couple of weeks for the edit to be integrated. Please use the flag icon to report any missing translation. Reports are the quickest way to change things in the course. :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JamesTWils

I did. I'm still iffy enough on the partitive that I wanted to make sure.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Kyleco5088

Not sure if I want to go Finland if there's cows going about kicking cars!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/chaered

You are right, it does not behoove cows to do so. It is udder madness.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/simon486678

It's the grass and the outo mushrooms. Lehmät on söpöt mutta kaukana ("far out"?)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/w3WLnVmI

I don't understand why "the cows are kicking the car" is wrong. In the previous exercise, it was wrong NOT to use the progressive present tense. There may be a subtle difference in these exercises but it seems beyond the capacity of beginners to catch this?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KristianKumpula

That would be "Lehmät potkivat autoa". The reason is the fact that "potkia" expresses continuous kicking that is not temporally confined, whereas "potkaista" (which is where "potkaisevat" is conjugated from) is a momentane verb, expressing one kick.

Learn Finnish in just 5 minutes a day. For free.