"Je sais, tu me le rappelles trois fois par jour !"

Translation:I know; you remind me of it three times a day!

July 4, 2020

21 Comments
This discussion is locked.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/bsun95
  • 1356

"You remind me about it" should be accepted too (I've reported it.)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/carcs1

Because it is "of it" shouldn't we use "en" instead of "le"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ymeagain

I don't think so, in the given sentence, as rappeler doesn't require a following de, despite the common English translation.

[Collins dictionary: rappeler qch à qn to remind sb of sth]


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TwoBeersPlease

I've questioned this on other threads: how do I know when to use "me le" and when to use "le me"? I used to put the personal pronoun before the other, but usually marked wrong - but not this time!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/--Roody--

It is tricky. Duo teaches with a naturalistic method, so you can just memorize these object pronouns as you go through the course. But if you learn better with rules and lists, here's an article with a comprehensive overview:

https://www.thoughtco.com/french-object-pronouns-1368886


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/CSA_GW
  • 1801

Here, duo makes "of it" mandatorily required in English. I have seen at least 4 other exercises where duo neglected "of it" in the English.

I do not mind what English duo speaks, but only wish Duo be consistent so that we won't make so many unnecessary mistakes.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TimmyKilminster

In English, you don't need "of it". "I know, you remind me three times a day" is probably more common than Duo's version, especially since the context is plainly informal.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Kevin968039

@CSA_GW it looks as if Duo listened to you. I just did this again and this time I left out "of it", and Duo accepted it! Merci pour ça. :-)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/HelenSmith409579

Remind me about it. In english you wouldn't say remind me of it in that way. Strange!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Vic3141

I know, you remind me of it three times every day


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sisir360

Why can't I say "thrice a day" instead of "three times a day"? Is there a word for "thrice" in French, and that's why I was marked wrong?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Vic3141

I have never heard 'thrice' used in my sixty years


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sisir360

I have used it all my life and can confirm it is not grammatically incorrect. But on googling, I find it is apparently considered dated and is no longer used in mainstream English. Interesting.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ymeagain

I think you have kept open a kind of "portal" here to linguistic past times. Well done! The Oxford Dictionary of Quotations (1953) has a few entries for the word e.g.

JOHN DONNE 1571? -1631 [Air and Angels]

Twice or thrice had I loved thee, Before I knew thy face or name, So in a voice, so in a shapeless flame, Angels affect us oft, and worshipped be.

[Apparently, thrice derives from: Middle English thries, in turn from Old English thriga, thriwa - Reader's Digest Universal Dictionary]


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Vic3141

Interesting. Thanks


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Vic3141

Yes. It is gramatically correct. Just dated as you say.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/flo486620

"you remind it me three times of a day" n'est pas bon?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TimmyKilminster

No, that’s incorrect. The “me” has to follow “remind”.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Lucia990165

The English translation wouldn't be: "I know, you remind it to me three times a day"? Is it correct?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TimmyKilminster

Nope! Sometimes prepositions map exactly between languages, but often they don't.

There are two options in English: "You remind me three times a day" and "You remind me of (or about) it three times a day."

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