"Il gaspille les ingrédients dont il n'a pas besoin."

Translation:He wastes the ingredients that he doesn't need.

July 7, 2020

28 Comments
This discussion is locked.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LSadun

The pronunciation of gaspille in the recording has a stressed final e, much like gaspillait. Is that correct?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Aelfwine81

Yeah, that's how it's usually said. Because the "ll" is silent, it just seems to make the "e" more obvious than in other words ending in "e". I was going to say that it couldn't be "gaspillait" because "il" is singular. But, when spoken only, you have no idea if it's "il" or "ils", but if in a real conversation you already knew you were speaking about an individual person, that might be helpful.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LenReed

It can't really be plural because dont il n'a pas is singular. The first part can be heard as plural only if you're willing to say the French means "They waste ... that he doesn't need." Possible but unlikely.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GraemeSarg

With the recordings in the new audio system it has become a silent "e". Reverso agrees (not that that is much of a guarantee). Google is so garbled that it is difficult to tell and cannot be relied upon anyway.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/tachyonashley123

Forvo, for comparison. (Only one recording, in which the e is silent.)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GraemeSarg

But surely a stand-alone word does not necessarily tell you how it will sound in a sentence.

I would not be at all surprised if a regional accent caused the "e" to become audible.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LenReed

Exactly! In particular, the earlier male voice on this site, now (mostly?) replaced, pronounced far more "mute" e's than a Parisian would. I suspect the comments here from mid 2020 are referring to that voice.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/tachyonashley123

You're both right, it's not much to go off. I was hoping there'd be more recordings, there often are.

Iirc the earlier male voice had a bit of a Southern accent, so maybe it was that.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/HarishAbbe3

I think it's because of the fact that "Les" is just following "gaspille". which makes it to sound like "gaspillait"...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RoslynJS

Mais qu'est-ce que cela veut dire en français ou en anglais?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LSadun

The English wording is a little off, but I think they're saying that he wastes the ingredients that he doesn't use. For instance, he buys a big bunch of parsley, uses a small amount for a recipe, and throws away the rest.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/neoscribe

When do we use "dont" & when "que"? "Il gaspille les ingredients qu'il n'a pas besoin." Are they interchangeable?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LenReed

Your sentence is wrong. It needs dont. Dont means de que and it's needed here because the construction is avoir besion de quelque chose. Que is used when the construction takes a direct object: C'est la maison que j'adore since it's adorer quelque chose (no de).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/neoscribe

Thanks for the explanation.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/NickWoodal1

What is wrong with " He wastes the ingedients of which he has no need. I think this is an accurate translation. It was rejected.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LSadun

Technically, nothing. It sounds a little stilted, but I agree that it's 100% correct English. It also follows the French phrasing very closely. However, these units suffer from a severe shortage of accepted correct English translations. Eventually they might get around to accepting yours, but I wouldn't hold my breath waiting for that to happen.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Martyn413385

Agreed. It's a very poor statement in the first instance. If something is an "ingredient" then by definition it is needed in the making of whatever it is an ingredient of. As you said previously, this is about wasting the surplus quantities of the necessary ingredients. However it doesn't appear that this is what the French statement says anyway!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/david317145

Switched off soynd because of the voice. Wasted aural opportunity duo.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/david317145

This stupid voice is extremely difficult to understand: why does Duo use it in an aural exercise? Bonkers!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/david317145

This stupid voice is annoying and very difficult to understand. Why does Duo use it in an aural exercise??? Bonkers


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/pamph96

'he throws away the ingredients he doesn't need'. Why is this rejected?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LenReed

Throwing something away is not the same as wasting it.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Martyn413385

Agreed. However the statement is rather odd, in common with quite a number of Duo's examples. If this was part of a conversation then the response could easily be: "Oh, so what happens to them then?" and the answer: "He throws them away or gives them to the birds/dog or composts them".

Unfortunately outside the "Stories" we are never privileged to have a conversation in any of these exercises!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LenReed

True enough -- a lot of Duo's sentences are quite odd. But we are meant to translate what we see. Sometimes that inevitably requires some latitude or reworking, but when there's no reason to change the verb one should expect to be marked wrong for doing so.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Myrtle851041

Duo often inserts 'that' where it isn't needed. As well as unnecessary, it's wordy; colloquially ok, not concise.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GraemeSarg

But here it is fulfilling a function.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/William184984

The 'p' of 'gaspille' was pronounced as a 't'. Sounded like 'il gastie', so it made

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