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"C'est la baby-sitter que le chiot a adoptée."

Translation:She is the babysitter that the puppy adopted.

July 7, 2020

43 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/krullevaar

I'm usually okay with doing strange and unusual sentences in Duolingo but is this really supposed to mean that the puppy adopted the baby sitter (and not the other way around)?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ramona355161

I think it's a good way to check if you are paying attention, and also if you really understand the sentence and not just guess its meaning. :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Lee_with_2_Es

I did understand though, I just assumed it was one of those weird cases where the object and subject are reversed in translation like "tu me manques."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Teeee6
  • 1065

Yep, Duo was being clever and trying to catch people out- I nearly fell for it.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RainyJan

I did fall for it


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PixieAmanda

In the US we often affectionately say that our pets adopted us. Meaning it was destiny for them to come into our lives and they vastly improve them much like a child. There are popular bumperstickers that say "who adopted who?" here.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/alexmiller1201

I wonder if it also means "we tried several babysitters, but this is the only one the puppy liked."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/hm437e
  • 1566

Same in Canada.
In fact, the best way to select a pup from a litter is let them come to you. The one that shows you the most attention is the one you are likeliest to have a strong bond with.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jojo553168

Yes, that's what it is supposed to mean (Don't ask me why).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ErnestGree4

I had the same question. I even got it wrong at first because I didn't give it the level of attention and wrote what registered.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Katherine82873

I'm amazed that French doesn't have its own word for babysitter.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/pirround

The anglicism "baby-sitter" probably wouldn't be considered proper French in Quebec. Frantastique (https://www.gymglish.com/en/frantastique/french-translation/baby-sitter) indicates gardien(ne) as an alternative. The Office québécois de la langue française agrees (http://gdt.oqlf.gouv.qc.ca/ficheOqlf.aspx?Id_Fiche=8870074).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Gord543537

In Québec, the word STOP on traffic signs is not allowed with the same reasoning, however, 'stop' is from the old French verb 'stopper.' This is a fact of which the Québec language police seem unaware.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sean.mullen

That is absolutely incorrect. There are many bilingual stop signs in Québec with both 'stop' and 'arrêt' on them. The modern French verb stopper was borrowed from English 'stop' in the late 18th century, not the other way around. 'Stop' is a Germanic word.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/StanimirCv

The puppy adopted the babysitter? Really?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/alexmiller1201

Why not?? Imagine the baby sitter came, and when it was time for her to leave, the puppy ran and jumped in her car to go with her.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PixieAmanda

In the US we often affectionately say that our pets adopted us. Meaning it was destiny for them to come into our lives and they vastly improve them much like a child. There are popular bumperstickers that say "who adopted who?" here.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RSchonning

Why is adoptee female?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sean.mullen

Because the direct object of the past-tense verb (la baby-sitter) is stated before the verb -- that's the only situation in which the participle agrees in number and gender. If they were "les baby-sitters" (feminine), then it would be adoptées.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PixieAmanda

In the US we often affectionately say that our pets adopted us. Meaning it was destiny for them to come into our lives and they vastly improve them much like a child. There are popular bumperstickers that say "who adopted who?" here.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sean.mullen

Exactly! This idea is so common here that I wondered why so many people were commenting that this sentence is strange!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Pia-Marita

... that the dog accepted?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JessicaMed172525

And I think this is sexist. Why baby sitters should be women?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sean.mullen

It's not sexist -- baby-sitter can be masculine or feminine.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/VisnjaLuki4

You are confusing me... I thought it was impossible...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/VisnjaLuki4

But well... It is true...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/georgy242078

We are learning French, so it is better to use the sentences that are used by French.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PixieAmanda

This is a reasonable sentence that could be used in any language, especially by animal lovers.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Rheta2
  • 2196

I'm trying to learn French.... seriously


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jim924808

A puppy cannot adopt anyone. As one sometimes suspects, Duo's French is just as unreliable as its English.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sean.mullen

Of course it can. It means the puppy has a special fondness for this babysitter and has 'chosen' her. This is pretty common terminology for animal lovers, especially those with rescue animals. In the USA, I've seen a lot of bumper stickers that read "Who adopted who?"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/alexmiller1201

Exactly. My dog Daisy, when I went to the shelter, they had to throw a blanket over her to get her out of her kennel to come meet me. She was terrified of everyone. I knelt down with my back to her to give her time to decide whether to approach me. After a few minutes she took a treat out of my hand, which she hadn't done with any of them. And ten minutes later she was sitting on my feet, letting us know she trusted me and wanted to go with me. She adopted me, so I took her home.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/rojabell89

How does a puppy adopt something? HUMAN ABUSE!!!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PixieAmanda

In the US we often affectionately say that our pets adopted us. Meaning it was destiny for them to come into our lives and they vastly improve them much like a child. There are popular bumperstickers that say "who adopted who?" here.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RonaldKirc

"whom" the puppy adopted is correct; "that" is not used with people


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RonaldKirc

Should be "whom" the puppy adopted; in English, we do not use "that" for people.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sean.mullen

According to Merriam-Webster:

"In current usage that refers to persons or things, which chiefly to things and rarely to subhuman entities, who chiefly to persons and sometimes to animals. The notion that that should not be used to refer to persons is without foundation; such use is entirely standard. Because that has no genitive form or construction, of which or whose must be substituted for it in contexts that call for the genitive."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/roOodie

I love that you link to recognnized authorities in your answers, sean. I do the same thing. None of us are professional grammarians or linguists, so we should back up what we say. Merci !!!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/YvonneDone1

But Merriam-Webster is a dictionary of American English. Perhaps RonaldKirc is British, in which case he is correct to say that 'whom' is preferred when referring to people.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sean.mullen

The British use 'that' to refer to people, too. And you are not paraphrasing Ronald; "'whom' is preferred when referring to people" (which might be true, stylistically) is not equivalent to "in English, we do not use 'that' for people" (which is false).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/YvonneDone1

I was paraphrasing Ronald, quite intentionally, because, while I am aware that the British do use 'that' to refer to people (therefore, as you say, Ronald's statement was incorrect), grammatically 'who'/whom' is preferred, hence the paraphrasing of Ronald's statement.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sean.mullen

You did not paraphrase; please look up what 'paraphrase' means. 'That' for people is fully grammatical... 'who/whom' is a preference or stylistic choice for many, which has nothing to do with grammar.

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