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  5. "Mon beau-père et ma mère se …

"Mon beau-père et ma mère se sont séparés."

Translation:My stepfather and my mother split up.

July 7, 2020

18 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/dukeleto

How about: My stepfather and my mother are separated.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jojo553168

are separatedsont séparés. (present tense)
split upse sont séparés. (past tense)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MikeJarvis4

I disagree. If you are separated now, then you have split up. They do mean the same thing in this case.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Lisaskier

I agree with you Mike, IMO "separated" means the same thing in this instance, and is preferable to "Split up" .....especially in language App.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Geoff_Campbell

Thanks for the explanation


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Daniel589120

If you drop the are then it works, My stepfather and mother separated. was just accepted by the system.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/virginiapa727163

"separated" should be accepted it means the same as split up!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ppkzH80V

Really strange (but as beau-père appears to mean both father-in-law and step-father) I tried "my father-in-law and my mother have separated", and duo accepted it!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AntRhonda

"are separated" equals "they have separated" as an English construction -- a more pleasing phrase than the disrespectul "split up," given the generations involved.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Qiset1
  • 1482

Since it doesn't like "are separated", what is another term for "split up" which is a hideous expression in my opinion.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MikeJarvis4

It accepts "have separated". IMO, "are separated" and "have separated" mean the same thing in this context, but duo doesn't accept the former.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Gord543537

Picture a judge looking down from the bench asking, "So when exactly did you split up? And furthermore, did you hang around or bugger off after you broke it off?"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Richard7281

But what is wrong with ... They "separated"????


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ryan345350

Beau-père is also "father in law"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ShonaGibso

How about using divorced instead of separated?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/oNcPAsW2

NEVER end a sentence with a preposition!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Qiset1
  • 1482

Actually, I discovered recently that it is considered informal English and is allowed. Go figure. Surprised me too.

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