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"Veel Nederlanders doen hagelslag op hun brood."

Translation:Many Dutch people put hagelslag on their bread.

4 years ago

38 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/Yoel.
Yoel.
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Hagelslag:

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SebastianChw
SebastianChw
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Doen Nederlanders ook roomboter op het brood met de hagelslag, of gewoon hagelslag?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/FreekVerkerk
FreekVerkerk
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Not: .. op DE brood, but .. op HET brood. And yes roomboter or margarine, otherwise the hagelslag does not stick so well to the bread.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SebastianChw
SebastianChw
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That's right, thank you for the correction! :) edited

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jennesy
jennesy
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ik heb het niet met roomboter maar met pindakaas! heel lekker! (maar aleen met de chocoladehagel)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/kaybekwa

Funny story: My dad's family, for some unknown reason, calls hagelslag muiskakken (mouse poop)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Raahiba
Raahiba
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When a baby is born in the Netherlands, it is customary for people to eat beschuit met muisjes, a hard rusk-like biscuit with little round (gendered pink or blue) sprinkles on top. I expect the name comes from a similar thought!

Picture of beschuit met muisjes: http://www.studiooosterman.nl/wp-content/uploads/2012/10/beschuit-met-muisjes.gif

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/silverthornfire
silverthornfirePlus
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I was going to mention this but you beat me to it. Also these round toasts are called 'Dutch toast' and sold in the UK. I encountered them before I moved to Holland so it was an epiphany moment when I was offered one when a work colleague was celebrating a new baby. :-)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/prwh
prwh
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A slightly politer term sometimes heard in the Netherlands is "muisjes". I once heard them called "jimmies" in an ice cream salon on Harvard Square in Cambridge MA.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/sb408dh
sb408dh
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Muisjes is something different all together. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Muisjes

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JamesTWils
JamesTWils
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Jimmies is the standard term in Eastern New England, as far as I know. It is simply sprinkles in the rest of the United States.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Gymnastical
Gymnastical
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In Massachusetts, yes that is the term. But in Connecticut, we just say sprinkles. I can't speak for the rest of New England though.

Sources: I am from Connecticut but lived in Massachusetts one time.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JamesTWils
JamesTWils
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My wife is from Tolland, which is about the westernmost area that says "jimmies," I think. That's why I said Eastern New England. Of course, when thinking of Connecticut, I usually divide it into the New York sphere of influence and the Boston sphere of influence. I lived several years in the former and married into the latter.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Gymnastical
Gymnastical
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I'm from a little bit further south and a little bit further east than that and there's really more British influence than from Boston and New York though Connecticut fashion does almost completely imitate that of New York City. I'd be curious about whether odd patterns like this exist in the Netherlands or Belgium

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/cmw0513
cmw0513
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I heard the same thing in Belgium!

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rebekasto
rebekasto
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I can't imagine why :)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Gymnastical
Gymnastical
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Mag ik stel waarom?

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/kaybekwa

Hageslag lijkt op de poep van muizen

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/GeorgeMaxw3
GeorgeMaxw3
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I have some hagelslag a Dutch friend gave me but I always put it on toast. Which leads me to ask why I've never learned the word for toast on here?!

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/algomyst
algomyst
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"geroosterd brood"

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Imporeo1
Imporeo1
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In Australia we call it fairy bread although we use 100's and 1000's

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AlexWolffe
AlexWolffe
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So, it is almost like fairy bread?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Janna581596
Janna581596
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How is "hagelslag" pronounced in english?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jamesjiao
jamesjiao
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THere is no such word in English... .

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/silverthornfire
silverthornfirePlus
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True they should translate it to sprinkles really since that is what it is... but this chapter is all about Dutch food....

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jamesjiao
jamesjiao
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Not quite sure what you are trying to say. The OP asked for the word's pronunciation in English... as this word currently does not have an accepted loan form in English, it thus has no known 'correct' or 'accepted' pronunciation. So my implied point was - you can pronounce it however you feel natural in English.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/04smallmj
04smallmj
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Could I use zetten instead of doen here?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/El2theK
El2theK
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No, zetten is only used if you physically put something on something else, e.g. put a cup on a table. When putting something on your bread (or food) doen is used.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JamesTWils
JamesTWils
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But the hagelslag is physically on the bread, right? You mean that zetten can't be used if something is dropped on something else?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/El2theK
El2theK
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Hence I clarified that if you put something on your bread (or food) doen is used. In this context zetten is not used.

Zetten is only used when you put something on top or into something else, like putting a cup on a table, or putting something in a closet etc.. Yes, it is possible to put something on top of a sandwich or in a sandwich, but as clarified previously zetten is not used, in this context.

Vice versa, if you put a cup on a table, you don't use doen.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JamesTWils
JamesTWils
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So, then, if I'm understanding this right, the difference has to do not with the action (whether dropping or setting) but rather with the thing placed, in this case food. Even if I were gently to set a cherry on top of an ice cream sundae, then, I guess it would be doen, not zetten, right?

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/El2theK
El2theK
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That's correct.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JamesTWils
JamesTWils
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Thanks again.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Bruce_OBrien

Duo niet accepteert het antwoord "Many Dutchies have chocolate sprinkles on their bread." - Dutch version of fairy bread. - Bread with Jam plus 100's and 1000's on the bread.

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/FreekVerkerk
FreekVerkerk
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"Dutchies" is the problem. It is like "Yankees" and Frenchies" and "Ukkies".

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JamesTWils
JamesTWils
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Actually, as an American, I'm a little unclear on those as well, though I am certainly familiar with them (if you mean "Ukies" for Ukrainians). I know the term "Yankee" is often meant to be insulting, or at least dismissive, but the only Americans I have known to take offense at it were Southerners who did not like to be called by a name they use for Northerners. Indeed, it is sometimes used by Northeasterners referring to themselves, for instance to boast of Yankee ingenuity (they definitely do not mean people from the rest of the US).

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/FreekVerkerk
FreekVerkerk
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I don't know if these are offensive names, but i just think Duo sticks to the offical names. I am a dutch native and i am not aware that dutchies is a negative qualification or positive. Please tell me :)

7 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JamesTWils
JamesTWils
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It just sounds like a cute, little nickname to me.

7 months ago