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  5. "À quatre heures, il n'a touj…

"À quatre heures, il n'a toujours rien mangé pour le goûter."

Translation:At four o'clock, he still hasn't eaten anything for the afternoon snack.

July 10, 2020

15 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/leeviticus

this... is a terrible sentence in so many ways


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Geoff_Campbell

at the very least it should be "... for an afternoon snack.", but it's still pretty bad.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/HarishAbbe3

Toujours = always and Toujours is also still....... Encore= still ,again....alors peut-on utiliser encore au lieu de toujours ici.... So can it be"" Il n'a rien encore mangé ................merci.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/choracavaco

You must keep "rien" next to "mangé": "il n'a encore rien mangé" is fine.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/HarishAbbe3

But I had read somewhere that this adverb ( encore) goes right after the second negation ( pas, rien ) in negative sentences.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/choracavaco

Well, I don't know where you read that, but "pas" and "rien" are different animals. To begin with, "rien" is not only a negative particle, like "pas", but can also be the subject or the direct object (it's the case here) of the sentence. You might want to look at these examples from grammar books:

https://tinyurl.com/ya2ee7xh

https://tinyurl.com/y9glkab9


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JimCassels

Shouldn't this be "quatorze heures" if we're talking about afternoon tea. "Quatre heures" would indicate early morning.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ymeagain

I guess le goûter indicates the part of the day involved. [BTW, 4 p.m. would be seize heures, I think]


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KateMcCabe4

In this sentence, DuoLingo uses "quatre" for four o'clock. In another sentence in this lesson, if you don't use "quatorze", it is marked incorrect. Inconsistent, as usual.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Elizabeth870279

I do not understand what this sentence means.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Martyn413385

Is this also nonsense in French?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SusanWashi1

Wouldn't a more comfortable sentence be, "It is four o'clock in the afternoon, and he still hasn't eaten anything for his snack? Just wondering


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/rangerrusty

I thought on the audio that mange was manger and the translation would be: At four o'clock he always has nothing to eat for the afternoon snack. Evidently I was wrong. I guess jamais would replace toujours in that case.

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