"J'ai du mal à laver mes vêtements en soie."

Translation:I'm having trouble washing my silk clothes.

July 11, 2020

32 Comments
This discussion is locked.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/HarishAbbe3

1) "i have a hard time washing my silk clothes"..... 2) " I'm having a hard time washing my silk clothes ....... 3) I'm having trouble washing my silk clothes.........all lead to the same meaning.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RichardHoma

Since this is apparently a new course, and there are so many ways to translate this sentence, it may take some time for Duo to do the necessary programming to accept them all.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ThurstonBell

I thought "J'ai du mal a ..." could be translated as "I'm struggling to..."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RichardHoma

'I have a hard time washing my silk clothes' should be accepted.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MariaIramendy

Why I'm having trouble and not I have trouble?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GraemeSarg

Both should be accepted.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/chriswalli8

I thought this meant I'm sick of washing my silk clothes (by hand ). Would that be de laver?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RichardHoma

The only instance I can find where 'mal' is translated as 'sick' is 'J’ai mal au cœur', which can be rendered 'I feel sick' or 'I am sick at heart'. It's usually translated as 'pain' or 'trouble'. I think 'j'en ai marre de...' is used to convey the idea of 'I'm sick of' in the sense of 'I'm fed up with' or 'I've had enough of'.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Christopholous

First world, first world problems!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DianaM

Washing silk is indeed very tricky.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Flanders1

Agree. Linen is also a pain.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/fannta94

"I have trouble to wash my silk clothes" not accepted.... why??


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DianaM

The "to wash" is the problem. That is just not English syntax.

You can say either, "I am having trouble washing..." or "I have trouble washing...", and both versions are accepted here. But "to wash" just doesn't work.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/fannta94

thanks, english is not my native language


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DianaM

You're welcome. I really admire all the students here whose first language is not English. That seems to me quite an extraordinary undertaking. Bonne chance!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DiverLothar

Thanks for the explanation, but than Duo should not provide it as an option. That makes it unnecessarily even more difficult for the non native English speakers!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DianaM

I'm not sure what you mean.

If you are talking about the word-tiles that we are sometimes given to choose from, of course some of the choices will be wrong, otherwise there is no point in the exercise.

If you are talking about the drop-down list, it's best to think of that as a very simple kind of dictionary. When you look something up in a dictionary, it will often give you several possible meanings for a word. It cannot tell you which meaning is appropriate for the use you have in mind. "Laver" can mean "to wash", it just doesn't work in this context.

I recognize, in fact I am very impressed, that some students here are not completely fluent in English, and, obviously, that makes the process more difficult for them. But it is a course in French "for English-speakers". You can't seriously expect Duo to use only simplified English to accommodate your level of comprehension. And besides, you just learned something about English that you didn't know before. Is that bad?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Flanders1

As a native English speaker trained in linguistics at university level, I really thinks it is not good enough, when Duo teaches poor English sentences.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GraemeSarg

This course is not teaching English sentences, it's teaching French sentences.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DiverLothar

I am talking about the drop-down list and I don't expect that Duo uses simplified English. But I expect that Duo uses correct English what it often enough doesn't. And I expect that it doesn't accept American English only, what too often happens too. And if I am using a dictionary, I am aware of that there are a lot of options which may not fit in all situations and I have to find out which one fits best for my purpose. But if I am learning a language with a computer program and I am looking in the hints, because I am unsure about the correct solution, I expect a choise of correct options and no wrong ones. And the worst is - and I already had that more than once - if all three given options are wrong. And by the way, if I want to improve my English, I take an English course. But if I am in any other language course, I am focused on learning that language and I am not looking for improvements of my English.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Flanders1

Totally agree with you DiverLothar about being annoyed at only incorrect options being given. The English options provided need to make sense. I'm not looking for improvements in my English, just correct English.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Flanders1

I sympathise with you, fannta94. I too struggled when I spent a year studying a language from another language that is not my native language. (in my case it was Japanese from Indonesian) It is very hard. Keep up the great effort!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/liuxiangqun

I have trouble to...?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RichardHoma

"In my view to have trouble doing sth is a verbal idiom with gerund derived from: to have trouble with doing something. It is a mere convention that the community has adopted the gerund as complement instead of the to-infinitive which theoretically would do as well." https://ell.stackexchange.com/questions/61177/have-a-trouble-ing-in-trouble-ing


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/cobold

Is silken clothes possible or does it sound strange?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GraemeSarg

It sounds strange. In modern usage it is mostly used to mean "like silk" rather than "made of silk".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SubhashJun1

I am having difficulty in washing my silk clothes---- was not accepted also, thanks Duo


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mxkieran

No one has ever said or will say that


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DianaM

What makes you say that?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Flanders1

When I was younger, I used to have many clothes made of silk (I remade lots from old dresses I got in op shops), and every one was hard to wash, requiring very delicate handling, so I disagree with you.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DianaM

I suppose "mxkieran" is arguing from a somewhat limited experience.

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