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"He is going to have to throw away the things that are on the floor."

Translation:Il va devoir jeter les choses qui sont par terre.

July 11, 2020

8 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mlertym

Why not sur le sol?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/uinni

Sur le sol is sort of "technical". par terre is what you would normally hear


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Balla583491

il va falloir nettoyer= he is going to have to clean il va devoir nettoyer/jeter= he is going to have to clean/throw away. When to use falloir? When to use devoir? Help!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/uinni

Actually:

il va falloir nettoyer = he is going to have to clean = it is going to be necessary to clean [literally].

It is an impersonal form. You use it whenever there is a need for something or an action to be accomplished.

When translated into English it is usually rendered by means of different constructions; eg:

So, il va falloir qu'il nettoie = he is going to have to clean (note that il doesn't refer to he) = il va devoir nettoyer (il refers to he).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Uma853398

Last time I wrote choses you corrected it to trucs. This time I wrote trucs you gave it wrong. Feeling frustrated :(


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sonorus702246

Why not "Il va falloir"? Marked wrong 2021 Apr 21


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/harrypots

I am afraid that I just cannot get the hang of when to use "des" and when to use "les". In this case the reference is to the specific things on the floor, and therefore I thought it should be "des", but that's wrong. But I do not really understand why. The items were specified as those on the floor not to all the things in the room.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/roOodie

I think you have it backwards.

  • Des is never for specific things. It's the plural of un/une. So it's for nonspecific things. (= some, any in English, or it's often omitted)

  • Les is for 1) specific things (= the); and 2) for generic things (omitted in English).

If you want more reinforcement, try reading an outside study guide. This one is a very short reference, but it has links for additional information.

https://www.lawlessfrench.com/grammar/articles/

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