"Ma mayonnaise à la vanille n'a plu à personne."

Translation:No one liked my vanilla mayonnaise.

July 11, 2020

29 Comments
This discussion is locked.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/qwUL3
  • 1821

I'm not surprised!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Kevin968039

My chocolate mayonnaise, however, was a Huge success! :-D hehe


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ArpsTnd

Could this be "Personne n'a aimé ma mayonnaise à la vanille"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KJptO1

Yes, i dont understand why duo phrased it like that.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Alex433433

For variety, I guess.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jamesjiao

Why shouldn't it be phrased like that?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GeorgeCaramanna

This sounds so disgusting I almost vomited in French.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/effyleven

My vanilla mayonnaise pleased no-one.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TJShannon1

I wrote that as well. It's a perfectly good translation of the given sentence, leaving nothing out and adding nothing in. I shall report it.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Graham622842

It is accurately more accurate.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JohnSabin

i would prefer effyleven's translation 'a personne' seems to indicate by no one


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/chriswalli8

Please could someone explain what the a (with acute accent) is doing there?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/shunting65

Plaire is constructed with à.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Richard784794

Think of "plaire à" as "to give pleasure to". So the 'à' is 'to', literally "my vanilla mayonnaise gave pleasure TO no one" or " no one liked my vanilla mayonnaise"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Frederick_W_V

À is frequently used connector. À la vanille here to show vanilla flavored. It's not avoir. vanilla ice cream: glace à la vanille. It would become au for a masculine food like glace au chocolat for chocolate ice cream.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/chriswalli8

Thanks eric, I meant the a acute in 'n'a plus a personne' as I thought ne....personne with an a before.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Martyn413385

Duo is usually so pedantic about literal or near literal translations - but this one seems to take something more akin to artistic license!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GraemeSarg

I think that Duo is trying to teach us that, in this type of context, in general, a francophone would choose to use "plaire à" and NOT "aimer", whilst an anglophone would, in general, choose to use "to like" and NOT "to please".

What me might say though is "My vanilla mayonnaise appealed to no one." or "My vanilla mayonnaise didn't appeal to anyone.".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/4MaryAnn7

'My vanilla mayonnaise hasn't pleased anyone.' Another translation effort, but not accepted.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Islam2003

Why is "no one liked my mayonnaise vanilla" not accepted?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Gord543537

In English, adjectives usually are placed before the noun being described. So, we have 'chocolate cake' and 'vanilla ice cream.' The mayonnaise here has been flavored with vanilla, so it is 'vanilla mayonnaise.' 'Mayonnaise vanilla' would mean mayonnaise was added to the vanilla to enhance the taste of the vanilla. At Duo's restaurant, vanilla mayonnaise is always found on their fried bubblegum sandwiches.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/4MaryAnn7

'My vanilla mayonnaise pleased no-one.' I also translated the sentence this way but it was not accepted.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SusieDar

Whilst having the same meaning this correct response is a translation of a different sentence surely? My vanilla mayonnaise has pleased no-one ( or was liked by no-one) is surely more accurate?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Cripner

Duo is destroying the reputation of French gastronomy.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sandib67

Puleeze.....obvious typos ....sho ui ldnt


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GraemeSarg

You are dealing with a computer program and "obvious" does not compute.

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