"Les enfants ont mangé et maintenant la nappe est sale."

Translation:The children have eaten, and now the tablecloth is dirty.

July 11, 2020

10 Comments
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https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PatrickMar738533

Wouldn't "ont mangé?" be better translated to "ate?" "Have eaten" seems to be a different tense.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Nathan173901

Depending on the context, the French tense passé composé translates either as past simple or present perfect. Here we can see an apparent result of their action, hence the present perfect.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Vic3141

I wish i had been taught grammar terms in the fifties and sixties. Although, I've really only needed them on Duolingo.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/SuhailBanister

Il faut aussi vérifier en dessous de la table ! ;-)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/roger868968

People round here (Yorkshire) often say the "cloth", not necessarily the "tablecloth"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/rafal-elbing

Why, on many occasions, les (somethings) is translated to just (somethings) without "the", and here it is required?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Padi_Evans

Because looking at the context of this sentence, you can figure out that the speaker isn't talking about general children. But they're talking about a particular group of children who ate and made a particular tablecloth dirty.

When it's a general implication, like "Les enfants aiment jouer", you'll know it is translated into English as "Children like to play."


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DrMHaywood

For UK anglophones 'nappe'may be too similar to 'nappy' (US 'diaper') which could result in a spontaneous mistranslation of this sentence...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AdelaDvila

This is WRONG. Why can't it be "children ATE" instead of "children have eaten"?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/PatrickMar738533

You don't have to yell

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