"Mi jardín tiene un árbol y mucho pasto."

Translation:My garden has a tree and a lot of grass.

5 years ago

43 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/jonbriden

I was surprised to see "pasto" used in this way, as I think of it as the grass a cow eats (i.e. "pasture"). I was previously taught "césped" for grass/lawn.

I did a little research though, and found that in a number of Latin American countries "pasto" is the standard. In others and sometimes in Spain "grama" is used.

Overall though it looks like "césped" would be understood in most countries.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PalomaGea1

I'm from Spain. We use "césped" and "hierba". Sometime we say "verde", but we only say "pasto" when it is food for animals.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DevinJones4

Good context! So if I wanted to talk about my lawn (for whatever reason), "cesped" (don't have the accent key) or "hierba"? "Pasto" meaning pasture/hay sounds a bit odd to use out of that context.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/linguisticat
linguisticat
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Wow, I have only ever heard of "zacate" for grass, perhaps it is slang, or a border thing (Mexico/Texas). Has anyone else heard or used "zacate" before? Thank you for the other varieties of this word.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jonbriden

"zacate" is common in Central America and Mexico. Although in Mexico it can also mean scouring pad or dishcloth.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jonnyhewer

My gardener here in the Dominican Republic calla it "grama".

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/pRoXi6
pRoXi6
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I thought cesped as well. Maybe the garden has a bunch of grass but not a well manicured lawn.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Sparrow2015

I have also heard "la hierba" for grass. Is this accepted in most countries as well?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jurekcy1

According to my spanish teacher from Spain la hierba = the grass, el césped = the lawn

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TomDoyle

What an interesting garden...

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/FLchick
FLchick
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Don't forget Tom, that jardin is also yard. Apparently there is no unique Spanish word for yard.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rogercchristie
rogercchristie
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No surprise, FLchick. There is no unique word for yard in English either.
It is garden in English, jardin in French, jardín in Spanish, and yard in American.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/TomDoyle

That's a good point although I think that la yarda is specific to yard although el patio is more commonly used, isn't it? Isn't jardin more typically associated with garden? I don't know that I heard jardin for yard when I was in Chile but maybe it's a more common term elsewhere?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/FLchick
FLchick
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Thanks for your reply. I read a Duo discussion page and I don't recall anyone even mentioning la yarda as an option; I believe it was about what el patio means. Sin embargo, Duo aceptado jardin como "yard" para mi translación. I hope I haven't butchered the language with my Spanish sentence.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Kudog
Kudog
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This is the most depressing garden I've ever heard of... D:

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/happyhealt

To remember árbol imagine a great big bowling ball and bowl down the árbol.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Crazy-Diamond23

Nice, I just remember Arbor day.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AliciaBanks
AliciaBanks
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I learned "césped" in school and always associated it with proper 'Spain' Spanish and just recently started hearing people say 'grama'. Never heard of pasto or zacate before. I'm guessing "yarda" is slang adapted from English- for example, my students often say "el locker" instead of a more formal translation

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Foomancrue

that garden sounds awful.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Stephen291689

Doesnt pasto mean grass

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ibapah

If it gives lawn as one of the definitions of the word, then I would think it would accept it in the translation.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/transitivity111
transitivity111
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"Lawn" refers to the entire mass, though. You would never say "a lot of lawn."

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/InternalCorp.

i was about to put ''my garden has a tree and alot of grassy''

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rogercchristie
rogercchristie
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At least no-one has suggested that their garden has a lot of tagliatelle! ;-)

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LeviJames1

Whats the differnce between alot of and lots of?? Last time i check we used them the same way in english

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rogercchristie
rogercchristie
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First, it is a lot - two words.

As used in this exercise, I think a lot is uncountable (eg I drank a lot of tea today), and lots is countable (eg I ate lots of biscuits too).

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Blas_de_Lezo00
Blas_de_Lezo00
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When do we use a lot of and when lots of? These phrases are mainly used in informal English – lots of sounds a bit more informal than a lot of. Both forms are used in singular and in plural sentences.

It is not the phrase a lot of or lots of which determines singular or plural, but the noun of the sentence (here: water and computers).

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rogercchristie
rogercchristie
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There is a lot of confusion on lots of so-called English grammar websites about the uses of these two quantifiers.
I use "a lot of" for something that can't be counted, and "lots of" for things that can (theoretically) be counted.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Blas_de_Lezo00
Blas_de_Lezo00
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For rogercchristie. What do you mean with "something that can't be counted"? The difference between countable and uncontable nouns is not if they can be counted. Can "money" be counted? When we talk about grammar, the difference is if a noun has plural form and if it can be used in singular with the indefinite article. You are right, "lots of so-called English grammar websites" that deal with grammar as if it was mathematics. They are two pretty different things.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rogercchristie
rogercchristie
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You should not suppose that how I use "a lot of" and "lots of" complies with the grammatical definitions. Inappropriate use of "a lot of" and "lots of" can lead to lots of confusion - which is why I avoid them if I need to be precise.

Have a look at http://learnenglish.britishcouncil.org/en/english-grammar/nouns/count-nouns and http://learnenglish.britishcouncil.org/en/english-grammar/nouns/uncount-nouns where you can see more explanation and some examples of how they are used.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Blas_de_Lezo00
Blas_de_Lezo00
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From Michael SWAN, Practical English Usage, 17th impression 2003, OUP, entry 326-2, p. 319: "a lot of and lots of, These are rather informal. In a more formal style, we prefer a great deal of, a large number of, much or many. (Much and many are used mostly in questions and negative clauses). There is not much difference between a lot of and lots of: they are both used mainly before singular uncountable and plural nouns, and before pronouns... e.g. A lot of time is needed... Lots of patience is needed... A lot of friends want... Lots of us think it's time for an election.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rogercchristie
rogercchristie
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Thanks Blas_de_Lezo00. That's interesting and confirms what I said.
It's by no means the only part of English grammar that can trip us up if we are not careful.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Blas_de_Lezo00
Blas_de_Lezo00
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"Pasto" (= grass") is a word used in many Hispanic American countries, but it sounds odd for Spanish people, that use "pasto" only to refer to the food for cattle. In Spain the word "césped" is commonly used. In the Spanish public parks and gardens you can see the notice: "Prohibido pisar el césped", in Britain they say "Keep off the grass". The proverb says "Make hay while the sun shines", that is, to profit from something while one has the chance. In Spanish "cortacésped" is a "lawnmower", that is a "cortagrama" in Central America. "Garden" is used by British people when Americans say "yard", so most Americans' yards would be gardens in Britain. Britons call it a yard only if it is paved with concrete. "How many feet are there in a yard?" - "It depends how many people are standing in it".

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/FLchick
FLchick
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In the US , they used to say "Keep off the grass", but it meant something else.;-)

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Blas_de_Lezo00
Blas_de_Lezo00
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"You think the grass is greener on the other side of the fence" is a saying. For example, if the phrase seems to be spoken by a possessive wife, it may mean that another woman's husband is more desirable than your own. Does it?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/FLchick
FLchick
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I've always heard it said as "The grass is greener on the other side". Not addressing your scenario, I think it means that something you don't have may SEEM better than what you have, but usually you find out that it is NOT.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Blas_de_Lezo00
Blas_de_Lezo00
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Thanks for the explanation. Idioms are an amazing part of the learning of a foreign language.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Lieora
Lieora
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Why is "My garden has a three an a lot of grass." not acceped?

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rogercchristie
rogercchristie
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It seems a little strict but you have "three" instead of "tree", and "an" instead of "and".

DL would often just say "spelling mistake", but when it forms another valid word then we get "wrong".

Oh, and "acceped" should be "accepted.

Don't let it put you off, Lieora. We all make errors. I find I usually learn more from my mistakes than when I get it "right" all the time.

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Blas_de_Lezo00
Blas_de_Lezo00
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Para Lieora: TREE, not "three" & AND a lot of grass, not "an"

2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/heartegg

That's a weird garden.

1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Judi.Cannon
Judi.Cannon
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Ok, I have to ask it... Would you also use this for pot/weed/cannabis ?

8 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Blas_de_Lezo00
Blas_de_Lezo00
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¡Menos lobos, Caperucita!

8 months ago
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