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  5. "No, sinä olet aina mukava."

"No, sinä olet aina mukava."

Translation:Well, you are always nice.

July 12, 2020

17 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/astgarrido

How to friendzone in Finnish


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/HackExploi

That "no" really keeps confusing me, i know it means "well" but my brain gets very confused with the english "no", guess it needs practice to fully root the "no" word as well in finnish


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/NoeliaBarb13

hahaha, and no is a word in spanish too, and it confuse me too hahah


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/wood_eater

I feel you. I know "no" for the english no, as well italian but in polish (that short) "no" means (informal) yes; but if you keep draging it like "nooo" it might mean less agreement and more like "well" (still rather rude) ;D


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/liolio1230

In bulgarian "no (но)" means "but" :D


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/_AvidLearner_

Lol this sentence is kinda funny Person A: Hey, Ain't I nice?C'mon praise me. Person B: (sighs)Well, you are always nice!

Lol, I am laughing at my own joke. I had friends like this when I was a kid.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/N.B.933048

Why is 'no, olet aina mukava ' wrong?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/lauren350454

this is so frustrating im putting the correct answer


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ph.f6pMVe

This is a nice game to learn


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Harly_Wake

That Program translate wrong "sina" like "aina" is that not cool


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/3_Chat_Owls

That translation is correct. "sinä" = you, "aina" = always


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JuanJos469311

mukava means funny and nice, but duo only accept nice in this sentence


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/3_Chat_Owls

Funny is translated 'hauska' here, and it's correct. 'Hauska' is more entertaining, and 'mukava' (=nice) is more friendly, kind(ly), pleasant, and so on. One person can be both nice and funny, the meanings are quite near one another. Maybe a funny '=hauska' person can also be a little bit nasty and a nice 'mukava' person is not necessarily so entertaining. Maybe a 'hauska' person is more active, a 'mukava' person can be active or not so active? The difference is not big! But 'hauska' person is (a) positive expression. Too funny or ridiculous person is perhaps 'hassu' in Finnish. It is a light form from the word crazy. (A boisterous pet can be 'hassu koira' sometimes, too) I'm a native Finn, and I practice for the English test.: )


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/NoeliaBarb13

But, nice is a synonym of fine and i don't know why it put me worong

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