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  5. "Millaista paitaa etsit?"

"Millaista paitaa etsit?"

Translation:What kind of shirt are you looking for?

July 12, 2020

11 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LalyFerrey

why is it millaista and not millainen?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KristianKumpula

It modifies a noun phrase which is the target of an irresultative action. An irresultative action triggers partitive case for its object.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/S.Downs2

Whats wrong with "what sort of shirt are you looking for? It should have been accepted


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Andrew713382

Nothing wrong at all but Duolingo keeps making these frustrating and rigid decisions.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sekondname

The course is still being developed. And new answer variations must be entered manually and take time to enter the course after addition. So the best thing to do is report it.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AndrBallon

We all should be grateful to Duo.!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sekondname

Previously, "millainen" worked with both "what kind" and "what sort". "Millaista" should as well. I reported.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/8TOW7

Why is 'what shirt are you looking for' incorrect? Maybe my English isn't good enough, but I think that it has a similar meaning.


[deactivated user]

    "What shirt are you looking for" means the person has some specific shirt in mind, that most probably he owns or one that is at least familiar to him. As in, the person owns 29 shirts and he's looking for one of them.

    "what kind of shirt" on the other hand implies the person only wants to find a shirt that looks a certain way. A blue shirt with an owl on it, maybe. This probably would most commonly be used when buying new clothes.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KristianKumpula

    That's more specific.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/pieni_chilipalko

    That would be "Mitä paitaa (sinä) etsit?".

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