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  5. "Viineri on tanskalainen leiv…

"Viineri on tanskalainen leivos."

Translation:The Danish pastry is a Danish pastry.

July 12, 2020

26 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/olaimonas

Would be hard to find a sentence more stupid than this.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/annika_a

The objective of this course is to teach you Finnish words and grammar... If this sentence makes the word viineri memorable, one small goal has been achieved. Were you expecting Kivi and Waltari?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/LTCLinguas

Annika, I usually love your comments, but on this one... On top of everything, you are required to use the article "the", which is actually optional in English here - which means the focus ends up being on the English translation rather than on learning Finnish. So overall this is just a disaster example. Things like that do happen, so it seems to me it would be better to see the criticism as an opportunity to improve the course rather than defend what is in place...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/demoographics

"The Danish is..." should be allowed (it's quite common to refer to them as Danishes)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/simon486678

Nice. So can we refer to the people who come from Copenhagen as Danishes?

The object was called a Danish pastry (adjective : noun). A pastry of danish design, or whatever.

Then cut down to remove the noun, as a 'Danish' (pastry being understood). So ' Danishes' bastardizes an adjective with a noun ending.

The finnish sentence is a nice demonstration of how the 'Danishes' usage distorts things. It is saying :"The pastries whose original design might have been Denmark are Danish pastries" - or as often prefered: " the patries from Denmark are Danishes".

It is not saying "The Danishes are Danishes"

Personally, I think 'Danishes' is a very ugly usage. But you can't have your Danishes and eat them, I guess. Whatever that is supposed to mean....


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/anonyneko

The Danish pastry is, indeed, a Danish pastry.

Fun things are fun.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/annika_a

But in Estonia, a viiner is a Frankfurter sausage! So watch your viineri's...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/simon486678

And in much of Germany a frankfurter is a Wienerle. Tja funny stuff language.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Michael_Sokolov

Why can't I say Danish is Danish pastry?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/annika_a

That doesn't work in English.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/graidan

as we've noted elsewhere, it does in American English.

This is one of the reasons why I want the developers to pick a dialect and stick to it for all transations. Make everything acceptable of course, but the "official" translation switching between American and British is confusing.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/annika_a

"Danish is Danish pastry" works in American English? Without "a" or "the" at the start?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/graidan

Oh, i missed that. Yeah, a or the needed. A Danish is a Danish pastry. Sorry


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/simon486678

You don't need the second 'a'. It can be left out if you are generallizing


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Michael_Sokolov

I'm translating from Hebrew and we don't have an unspecified article, so I forget it sometimes. Thank you for clarifying it


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/graidan

In English, its never called a Danish pastry. It's just called a Danish


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AGreatUserName

No, not never. It's different in different places.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/graidan

Clarification. In spoken American English, in 50 years and all across the world, I have never heard it called a Danish pastry. Only in the most pedantic of contexts have I ever seen it labeled as such.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/AGreatUserName

Indeed. Meanwhile, many Brits here are completely unaware of them being called danishes without the word pastry.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mollydot

In Ireland I heard and said Danish pastry. Probably in the 80s. I just say Danish now, but my mother would still say Danish pastry.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mollydot

I think my switch was in the 90s shortly after someone said "a Danish" and I said "what's a Danish?". "You know, a Danish pastry, the spiral things with the icing and fruit"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/zamlet

That isn't quite true. If somebody has never seen or heard of a Danish before and asks me what it is, I might well respond with "A Danish is a Danish pastry".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MiaT1956

I would say "vieneri on tanskalainen kahvileipä". It's not actually "leivos".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Christophe250263

Yey! I can now translate 'A Danish pastry is a Danish pastry' into Finnish. I'm just wondering if there might be other things to learn more urgently? But maybe not. I have also learned that 'pulla' is 'a pulla' in English. I wonder how many english speakers know about that?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/zamlet

A Danish doesn't have to be Danish, after all. They make Danishes all over the world. I can go to the corner store and get Danishes that are made right here in the USA.

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