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  5. "Etsin jotain iloista ja kelt…

"Etsin jotain iloista ja keltaista."

Translation:I am looking for something jolly and yellow.

July 15, 2020

17 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/xatkaru

Happy should be accepted as a translation for iloinen


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/lk_
  • 1979

For those wondering about the use case for this, I see this in the context of shopping. The Finnish sentence sounds like it could well be said to someone assisting you e.g. in a clothes shop.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Webb.Paul

That being the case I'd suggest "something cheerful and yellow. "


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sarah803697

Spot on - I think that's the best choice of word, here.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/snickesnack

I get that some folks use jolly or gay when they're in the mood. Fine. But for the love of Pete, 'happy' should be the default translation of 'iloista' and most definitely accepted.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RebeccaWir5

Could someone explain the significance of this goofy sentence?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Greetje548205

You could say this in a shop if you're looking for a summer dress. For instance.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sarah803697

Kind of weird in the "Love" module, though, isn't it? Unless they're in an adult shop? The mind boggles.


[deactivated user]

    Reported: "I am looking for something happy and yellow" should be accepted.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/bernardop_rj

    Who lives in a pineapple under the sea?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JamesRitch14

    Jolly? In English, I have heard jolly only to describe St. Nick. Jolly is a word absolutely no one uses. How about fun.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ZacharyJean

    I haven't lived in Hammersmith or Putney for a while but jolly in the 1990s was a perfectly fine word in that part of London back in the day. Sort of like snog and bloody 'ell. Just because you don't hear it used on the mean streets of Vermont and New Hampshire these days doesn't mean the rest of the world has stopped using it too.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JamesRitch14

    That being said, the rest of the English speaking world uses jolly maybe twice at Christmas to describe Ol' Saint Nick, Hammersmith withstanding. I can assure you that if I started using jolly in casual speech, 98.99 percent of the English speaking world would think I was affecting a Putney/Hammersmith accent or they'd look at me sideways. Bloody 'ell, guvna.


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Bernard_Gang

    I have never been to Hammersmith or Putney, but I have still heard jolly used outside of Nickolas related contexts


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Webb.Paul

    I have no idea what this sentence means. Since it's part of the "love" lesson is it what a Finn would post on a dating site?


    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/lk_
    • 1979

    Nope, that would be etsin jotakuta iloista ja keltaista. You know, none of my business if some have unusual preferences...

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