Duolingo is the most popular way to learn languages in the world. Best of all, it's 100% free!

"She tried to go to Paris."

Translation:Ella intentó ir a París.

5 years ago

21 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/MarkofSky

Why does "trató" get followed by "de" while "intentó" does not?

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MikeyDC65

Several verbs in Spanish are always paired with certain prepositions (and others are not). Tratar is paired with de. Intentar is not.

We do this in English all of the time too, even in places where Spanish doesn't use them. For example:

  • I listen to the radio. -- Escucho la radio
  • I pick up the trash - Recojo la basura
  • I look for the keys - Busco las llaves

Using tratar without de is as odd to a Spanish speaker as "I listen the radio" is to an English speaker.

http://www.elearnspanishlanguage.com/grammar/verb/verbswithprep-de.html

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MystyrNile
MystyrNile
  • 14
  • 8
  • 7
  • 5
  • 4
  • 3

I like to think of such constructions in English as separate words. "pick up" "pick on" "pick out" and "pick at" are all different from "pick".

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JGarrick62

Perhaps true in the case of pick, but the general idea of his post is valid.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/MystyrNile
MystyrNile
  • 14
  • 8
  • 7
  • 5
  • 4
  • 3

Agreed. Looking in, around, for, etc. are all forms of looking. Although "look" is kind of a mix, since we also have "look up", and "look out" in the sense of "be aware of some inpending danger"

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/pauldiener

Hi - These combinations are called 'phrasal verbs,' and the meaning does change with each different preposition/adverb. Give in, give away, give back, give out, give up, give off, give up, give up on, etc. I recently bought a $35 phrasal verb dictionary from Hamilton.com (a remainder house) for just 5 bucks. They still have some available, I think. (You get cheap shipping if you buy several books and prepay with a mail-in order form. They are reliable.)

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/s_helmer

Thanks, I'll try and remember.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/emmy574558

thx. very helpful and learned a lot of new spanish verbs. gave you a lingot.

5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/robsm

Why isn't 'irse' acceptable? ..she's tryning to take her herself.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tiarella9
tiarella9
  • 23
  • 22
  • 11

I think "irse" implies going away from someplace, which would change the meaning of this sentence.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AurosHarman

That would mean something closer to "She tried to leave for Paris."

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Cestquiestquoi

why is it wrong to say "intentaba"?

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/dawithers

"Intentaba" is the past tense imperfect (an ongoing action) which translates to "was intending to" or "was trying to". "Intentó" is past tense preterite (only happened once, at a definitive time) "intended to" or "tried to".

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/letter_s
letter_s
  • 25
  • 25
  • 25
  • 25
  • 24
  • 10

Why couldn't you say"Ella intentó a ir a París"??? Thanks

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/s_helmer

I put the same thing and I think there is no"a" because it is not the future phrase voy a .

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/skittlzz
skittlzz
  • 22
  • 11
  • 8
  • 8
  • 3

Yes, there is also a post above explaining why "intentar" is alone and there is no "a" or "de" after it.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Scobin
Scobin
  • 12
  • 12
  • 12
  • 3

Hm, shouldn't "buscó ir" be accepted, too?

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AurosHarman

No, definitely not. Buscar can be used as "seek", but only if you mean it in the literal sense: "look for, search for". It's not used for "seek" in the metaphorical sense of trying various courses of action to achieve a goal.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Morven2

Why not, 'ella probó ir a Paris?'

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/AurosHarman

"Probar" is "try" in the sense of sampling or testing something. It's related to the English word "probe". It does not work for making an attempt at an action.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Morven2

Thank you aurosharman, that makes it clear

3 years ago