"Voici mon CV, donne-le-lui quand tu le verras."

Translation:Here is my résumé; give it to him when you see him.

July 17, 2020

14 Comments
This discussion is locked.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JamesRenni9

Seems odd that CV is the French for résumé here, you'd think it would be the other way round :-)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ZarrouguiL

Indeed. "Résumé" in French has a wide meaning. It's a summary, a synopsis, a recap of anything.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JamesRenni9

It's similar to how English has borrowed other words like chauffeur where the original meaning is more general and used them for something specific.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MandyB11

It works the same in UK English. We might either ask for a résumé or a précis if we want a more detailed or quicker recap/recounting of something respectively. There seems to be a lot of loan words going between specifically British English and continental French. We use far more French than many people realise - and I've had some people say they can never learn a language because they can't remember the vocab :D I suggest French to them (though tbh, it's not the vocab but the verb endings that get me. But at least it's not Latin or Classical Greek. Then there's noun endings by the hundred!)

I do wonder if it's the same in Canada with their languages?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Manuel599019

It doesn't seem odd to me, there are a lot of words that English borrows from other languages that have in English a different or more limited meaning than the original language.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/aacoetzee

What is wrong with 'Here is my CV, give it to him when you will see him'? It was marked wrong. Admittedly not the greatest English, but technically correct.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ReinholdHa8

"...quand tu le verras." is future tense! should it not be "when you will see him?"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Maria555493

Why can't we use CV for the translation? We use it here all the time?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/d10MplTj

Vraiment bizarre. American uses a French word and both French and UK English use the Latin.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/djamescha

As " the giving" and " the seeing " are both taking place in the same time frame, it somehow seems odd that they aren't in the same tense


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Margo548256

Resume or CV is the same thing in English. My answer should have been accepted


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Qiset1

A circum vitae is a lot more than a resume. Duo kinda missed this one.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ColinCanuck

I disagree. I've recruited people in the UK (reading CV's) and in Canada (reading Resumes), both were about 2 - 5 pages. Name, qualifications, job history, a bit about hobbies & memberships...

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