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  5. "Leo, haluatko sinä lisää täy…

"Leo, haluatko sinä lisää täytekakkua?"

Translation:Leo, do you want more layered cake?

July 17, 2020

24 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jon104870

"layered cake" is barely acceptable in my idiolect of English. "Layer cake" would be the term you'd use, but you'd only say that to distinguish between two different sorts of cake, eg, "I want more cake" "Do you want the layer cake or the sheet cake?"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Dylan600886

Agreed: "layer cake" is the more common term in my American dialect, too. I don't believe I've ever heard "layerED cake." BUT, in the regions where I've lived, I have heard it used commonly as a stand-alone term instead of as comparative term: "Ooo! Layer cake for dessert!" Especially when it's something extravagant, like ten layers of chocolate cake with raspberry filling between the layers. Anyway, I've reported my (incorrect) answer of "layer cake" as "should be accepted." Hopefully it'll be added.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Bernard_Gang

I guess if the Finns have a specific word they use a lot for layer cake we just have to accept that.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/graidan

"Layered cake" is not used, not in American english, anyway. We'd say "layer cake". But unless there's a reason to distinguish, it's just called cake.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Demian321988

reported with flag also. In UK english, it's layer cake - there's even a film with the same name


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Howard860606

To me want more layered cake could mean a cake with more layers!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/simon486678

I think you will have to specify it as in "do you want a cake with more layers" . "More layered" doesn't really work in english for cake.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jon104870

While I suppose it's possible to segment the English phrase "I want more layered cake" to mean "I want a cake which has more layers", I don't think any English speaker could get that reading. "I want more cake" treats "cake" as a mass noun (similar to "I want more beer" or "I want more oatmeal"). If we're drinking beer together, and we've tried a malty beer and a hoppy beer, and you say "I want more hoppy beer", you're asking for another glass of the latter, not a different beer which has a more pronounced hop flavor - for that you'd say "I want a more hoppy beer". Similarly, if you are asking for "more layered cake", you're asking for another helping of the same cake that you've already been served, not a helping of a different cake, this time with more layers to it. For that you'd say "I want a more layered cake".


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Ian400723

We would never say that in English. We would say do you want SOME more layered cake.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Bernard_Gang

"Do you want more cake?" sounds perfectly fine to me tbh


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RaymondElFuego

I also thought of adding "some". How would the sentence look in finnish to achieve this?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RoDe857230

as far as I understand, the partitive case already indicates the word "some". I think both answers (with and without "some") should be accepted (similar to previous exercises/questions). Although the translation with "some" sounds pretty weird to me...


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sarah803697

The translation without "some" sounds kind of blunt verging on impolite to me (British-born). Is this another UK vs US thing, I wonder? They seem to be popping up all over the place in this particular module!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Oinophilos

It's the same in the US. You can say "Would you like more cake?" but adding some is more natural, though in speech it's apocopated. NB: we even have a "treat" called Smores because one always wants s'more.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Howard860606

Yes, I agree! Although either is OK I'd normally include the some- and it is partitive!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Patito1703

Layer cake? Any cake with different layers or an specific one?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jon104870

You have all sorts of layer cakes - the main thing about a layer cake, from the baking perspective, is that you have the internal layer of frosting. From the American gustatory perspective, I suspect that the main thing about a layer cake is that you get a lot of cake.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Oinophilos

No, I think it's because you get more frosting or filling to moisten the cake.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Sarah803697

LOL - I'd say gateau (am English, though, not French). I hope that's not being too fancy :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/simon486678

I think Gateau is not at all bad. Though i think technicslly it doesn't strictly need layers. I guess German Torte would be close to what is implied? And i never ever heard layer cake. Do we mean maybe sandwich cake? Layered cake is clearly a ghadtly pseudo-translation.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Oinophilos

Gâteau is fine, except most Americans have never heard of it, like Auvergne or courgette (or marrow, for that matter).


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Howard860606

You may not have heard of them, but if you Google "Layer cake recipe" you will find dozens of them! It seems to me to be a perfectly acceptable translation.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/simon486678

Thanks. I am educated. But it still leaves "layered cake" in the linguistic fridge.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Jon104870

Which, if you ask me, is where it belongs, at least until someone realizes that it's been there for an awful long time, and in fact we can't remember where it came from, but... no, it couldn't be left over from Mary's party, could it? But that was AGES ago, anyway I don't like the look of it, let's throw it out before this metaphor completely runs out of gas.

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