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  5. "A faculdade fica longe da es…

"A faculdade fica longe da estação."

Translation:The college is far from the station.

August 8, 2014

19 Comments

Sorted by top post

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/dellelled

I think faculty should be accepted... In my university in the UK we have the Faculty of Economics, Faculty of Education, etc.

October 17, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Luis_Domingos

Do you mind posting a link to the official page of one of those faculties (if you want to protect your privacy, you can choose a different uni that has the same naming system). I'm not questioning the truthfulness of your comment (and I'll add the word anyway), but I'm sure our American students would frown at "faculty" being used here and having a link would help "settle" the issue somewhat.

Good luck with your studies (both here and at your uni)!

October 17, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/dellelled

Here you go: http://www.econ.cam.ac.uk, www.educ.cam.ac.uk Also: www.uc.pt/fduc, the Faculty of Law (Faculdade de Direito) in Coimbra, Portugal.

Thank you!

October 17, 2015

https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Luis_Domingos

Thanks - I was obviously aware of the Portuguese examples, but it's good to see them featured next to UK examples to highlight their similarities.

P.S. I didn't add "faculty" to sentences with "faculdade" where the latter is used as a general term for "university; higher education" - such as "Is university expensive?".

Thank you again, and good luck with your studies :)

October 18, 2015

[deactivated user]

    http://www.umf.maine.edu/majors-academics/geology/faculty/

    This any good, from a US university, no less!

    October 17, 2015

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Luis_Domingos

    Well, we don't use "faculdade" for the group of professors attached to a given course/degree/program (which is the "faculty" US students are used to thinking about). Hopefully that won't confuse people further!

    In any case, thank you for your input :)

    October 17, 2015

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ErikLearnSpanish

    faculty not accepted? Isn't this the closest translation you can get?

    August 8, 2014

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/mandolinera

    What is wrong with faculty. I think that school is for lower levels of education faculty for college or universities

    August 21, 2014

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/emeyr

    In the US, faculty = professors/adjunct professors in a given department. Universities are divided into colleges or schools.

    Quoting: "Harvard University has 12 degree-granting schools in addition to the Radcliffe Institute for Advanced Study." Within Harvard University is Harvard College - the undergraduate school which grants AB, SB degrees.

    October 17, 2015

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Hideen

    I don't think so. Faculty can also be used in "Mental faculty" and such. So I'm not sure, but I think in english people use either college or university.

    August 8, 2014

    https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ErikLearnSpanish

    Thanks! :) I found a definition for faculty now; and as you correctly point out it can be: an inherent mental or physical power. or it can be a group of university departments concerned with a major division of knowledge. e.g. "the Faculty of Arts" synonyms: department, school, division, section. I guess I just thought it could be used, since faculdade and faculty seems pretty similar on the surface-level of the word :p

    August 8, 2014

    [deactivated user]

      yes in British English Faculty would imply the Faculty of some discopline (Chemistry, arts, etc of a university). "faculdade" translates in to Frenh as "faculté", whih is often shortened to "fac", meaning University.

      April 30, 2015

      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/aykutkafka

      What's the word for faculty as in ''the faculty of letters''?

      September 15, 2015

      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Luis_Domingos

      A "faculdade" is usually a specialized college inside a larger "universidade"; for example, Lisbon University as a Faculdade de Direito (Law), Faculdade de Letras (Letters Humanities), Faculdade de Medicina (Medicine), Faculdade de Ciências (Natural Sciences), Faculdade de Psicologia (Psychology), Faculdade de Belas Artes (Fine Arts)...

      Since most people study in "faculdades", we also use the term more broadly for "university" (not in the sense of the organisation, but the actual higher learning experience).

      October 17, 2015

      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/tomrich11

      Could someone please post the many meanings of 'ficar' for me? Thanks!

      January 5, 2016

      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/sharkbbb

      Here are all the meanings from Wiktionary:

      1. (copulative) to become; to get; to end up
      2. (transitive with em or another locational preposition) to be permanently on a location
      3. (intransitive, or transitive with em) to stay (at); to remain
      4. (intransitive) to remain (to be left over)
      5. (transitive with em) to stay (to remain in a particular place)
      6. (figuratively, intransitive) not to go any further
      7. (auxiliary, followed by a verb in the gerund) forms the habitual aspect
      8. (Brazil, slang, intransitive, or transitive with com) to engage in a romantic relationship with someone for one night or some short period of time

      Also look at Wordreference

      February 19, 2016

      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/raf_iggy

      In American English, faculty is never used for "the" building (school, college, university) , but it is the group of educators that teach. You will see "the faculty of the university" meaning the group of people. Does "a faculdade" refer to a building (as the sentece implies) in formal potuguese? I cannot find that use of the portuguese word.

      November 28, 2014

      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JCMcGee

      Is that right? Here in the UK we say "The faculty of arts" or "The faculty of science" etc

      and "Jane is the head of faculty"

      I'd always thought it had come to us via US English.

      March 22, 2015

      https://www.duolingo.com/profile/vanessachanice

      yes, in portuguese you can use refering to a building

      March 13, 2016
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