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"We watched the same program."

Translation:Nosotros vimos el mismo programa.

2
4 years ago

41 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/AndrewWalk7

Why "el mismo" instead of "la misma?

31
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rocko2012
rocko2012
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Because "programa" is masculine. A lot of Spanish words ending in "ma" came from Ancient Greek and the words were already masculine in Greek so Spanish (or maybe Latin was a middleman) kept them masculine despite ending in "a".

96
Reply34 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rblock9

Very helpful and interesting to know

14
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/cdhicks1
cdhicks1
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-ma, -pa, and -ta are the same masculine thing.

18
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Lofty_Vagary
Lofty_Vagary
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I couldn't think of enough words to refute -ma and -pa, but off the top of my head, la tarjeta and la carta violates your -ta claim.

6
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/cdhicks1
cdhicks1
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Yes, I was corrected in another post. There seems to be many others that are feminine. Just have to learn them.

2
3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lynettemcw
lynettemcw
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None of the ending rules are absolute. It is el programa and el idioma, but la forma. My mother always told me that I should learn Greek. But having not done so, I can't recognize which are related to the Greek and which are not. If the same is true for anyone else, being aware of this rule may be helpful, but memorizing the article with the noun is still the best way.

1
9 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lynettemcw
lynettemcw
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Only if they come from Greek. My mother always told me I should study Greek. There were so many Greek words taken into Latin and Romance languages and many I don't recognize as coming from Greek.

2
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/NRPL123
NRPL123
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In response to Obedgilles, it looks like Greek is "hatching" on duolingo...not sure what that means. If you mouse over the little flag at the top of the page by your profile picture, you should see a drop-down menu which includes "add a new course," and you can see the available courses and the ones that are in progress.

1
2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Obedgilles
Obedgilles
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Is Greek ofered here in DL?

0
2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lynettemcw
lynettemcw
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NRPL123 Yes Duo hatches languages quite regularly. I know they use a core group of bilingual alpha users to set it up. I know when I started the Welsh course, it was marked beta. But, assuming that Obedgilles's question was based on my statement about learning Greek, I am not sure how much help Modern Greek will be. I am sure it has many of the Greek roots that other European languages do, but my understanding is that Classical Greek is unintelligible to a speaker of Modern Greek, as Old English is to us. I would be more excited about Greek on the horizon though if I didn't already have too much on my plate.

0
2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/sethpuckett84

What's wrong with "Vimos el programa mismo"? Why can't the adjective go after the noun here?

10
Reply4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Kevi9903
Kevi9903
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It's not that kind of adjective. If the program you watched could independently be described as the same, then you'd put mismo after, but that makes no sense. This is a comparison, so it goes before.

9
Reply23 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/ShelleyMcInroy

Thank you. I am bumbling along in Level 13, and still struggling with many of these concepts.

3
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Mujer134

Can you clarify what you mean by "independently described"? For instance, where would you place 'first', 'new', 'sad'?

2
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Kevi9903
Kevi9903
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I mean if it was an inherent quality of the noun, you would usually put that after the noun. But mismo/misma is a comparison. If you and I both drove a 2011 Honda Accord, and it was green, I might say "Tú tienes el mismo carro que yo." The comparison of your car to mine is not an inherent, independent property of your car. But, I might say "Tú tienes un carro verde."

First is also a comparative adjective, so primer/primera (drop the "o" from the masculine form) will go before the noun: "Este es el primer carro que he tenido." New (nuevo/a) can be tricky. If you want to say that you have a new car, you would say "Tengo un carro nuevo." But if you want to really stress that this car is new then you switch the order: "Tengo un nuevo carro." Both sentences might mean the same thing, but it's a difference of inflection, maybe in the first case you used to have a Ford, but now you have a Toyota; it's not new from the factory, but it's new to you. The second case, you might be stressing that it is the new 2016 model.

Sad (triste) is going to be used after the noun is almost every case, but if for some reason you really wanted to stress that a man is sad, you might say "El triste hombre," instead of "El hombre triste." But this would be used in a case where you are stressing the sad part of the description so much that you are basically saying "The pile of sad is a man," more than you are saying "The sad man."

About.com has a great article on this, including some good examples where the meaning can be very different depending on where you place the adjective: http://spanish.about.com/od/adjectives/a/adjective_placement.htm

7
Reply12 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Mujer134

Really helpful! Thanks, Kevi9903. A lingot for all your trouble.

0
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/winandfx

nuevo: el nuevo libro, the brand-new book, the newly acquired book; el libro nuevo, the newly made book. So un nuevo carro is a car which is new to you, isn't it? The newly acquired car. (also i cannot tell the diff. between brand-new and newly made but english is not my native language)

0
Reply1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Kevi9903
Kevi9903
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Brand new and newly made are pretty much the same thing. There is no real definition for the term "brand new" as much as it's just a distinction people sometimes use to really stress the newness, sort of like saying something is newer than new. I would interpret "el libro nuevo" as meaning "the newly acquired book" and "el nuevo libro" as the different book or new edition of the old book that I just switched to.

0
1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lynettemcw
lynettemcw
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I think you or your source got the distinction a little off. El nuevo libro is the newly acquired book. El libro nuevo is the brand new/newly made book. So compré un nuevo coche means you bought a car that was new to you, (either brand new or used) but compré un coche nuevo means you bought a brand new car. There is no linguistic difference between brand new and newly made.

http://www.spanishdict.com/guide/adjective-placement

0
11 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Kevi9903
Kevi9903
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@lynettemcw: From your link- An essential quality of a noun is something that is implicitly obvious about a noun even without the adjective being present.

Wouldn't the inherent newness of the car rolling off the assembly line be an essential quality of the car? New to me is not a quality of the car, it is a quality of the relationship between me and the car.

Although, from the about.com link: "nuevo: el nuevo libro, the brand-new book, the newly acquired book; el libro nuevo, the newly made book." So, I don't know what to think because "brand new" and "newly made" mean the same thing to me.

0
1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lynettemcw
lynettemcw
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Kevi 9004 I am replying here as I can't reply below. No new is not an essential quality of a car. You are using an adjective to define a subset of cars. It is like a pretty girl. Not all girls are pretty. Not all cars are new so it cannot be an essential quality of a car. A car is still considered a car when it is old. Most things considered essential qualities may have exceptions at least for arguments sake, but these things are generally considered essential characteristics at least within your region, field or culture. Ice is cold, night is dark, etc.

0
1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Kevi9903
Kevi9903
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Fair enough. I guess I just understood that one backwards. We're here to learn, thanks for helping me out.

0
1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/winandfx

So nuevo is a "Meaning-changing adjective".

0
1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lynettemcw
lynettemcw
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Yes, as you can see from that link. It is certainly one of the subtler changes. I am sure that some people could learn Spanish by immersion and not figure that out. But it actually eliminates the ambiguity of the English word new.

0
1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/amigo_abi

Señor un abrazo..y mycho respecto para usted . Usted ha hecho un trabajo bueno..sabe que este me ayude muchísimo

0
Reply2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Talca
Talca
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Would the verb MIRAR be appropriate in this sentence? Gracias. vimos = preterito and vimos = presente

3
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Bkofman
Bkofman
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I used "miramos" and it was accepted.

2
Reply2 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/tnpurtell
tnpurtell
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Why not "lo mismo programa"?

0
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Kevi9903
Kevi9903
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Because "lo mismo" means "the same" as a noun, as in the same way or the same thing. Like this conversation you might have after lunch from a street cart vendor in Mexico: "Me siento enfermo. ¿Tú?" "Lo mismo."

Here, we are using mismo as an adjective modifier for programa, so we are going to use "el" for programa.

3
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/nikimj

As I know when the noun is known (in the same sentence or the parties know what they're talking about) it needs to fit with the gender of the noun, el mismo or la misma. I have hardly seen lo mismo, maybe only in dictionaries.

0
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/hypek
hypek
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Why can't i use hemos visto? ;/ It should be perfectly ok. There is NO time adverbial (!).

0
Reply3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lynettemcw
lynettemcw
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With or without a time adverbial, hemos visto is present perfect and is the translation of the English present perfect we have seen. Translate tense for tense where possible.

0
Reply1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/RonWanmaker

Why not miramos? When do you have to use ver and when mirar

0
Reply1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/PontusKihl
PontusKihl
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The ancient greek had some rather masculine (sports) programs to watch I suppose... Olympics and all that

0
Reply1 year ago

https://www.duolingo.com/yahirb4

we watched the same program

0
Reply8 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/FredricMac

Will someone share why "Nosotros mirábamos el misma programa" is incorrect?

0
Reply5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lynettemcw
lynettemcw
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Strictly speaking it isn't. But the use of the imperfect in this case would normally be modeled using "we used to". The imperfect is used in three specific circumstances. It is used for repeated or routine events in the past. This is the usage that Duo likes to use used to for, although in the proper context we certainly don't always do that in English. The second is to set the scene in the past. This loosely corresponds to our past progressive, we were watching. There is a Spanish past perfect, but that is more focused on the event than simply setting the scene, and is less common. The third would not really applicable to this sentence. That is when the duration of the act is vague so it doesn't have a clearly defined or assumed start and end point. When you are talking about watching a program you don't have to specify how long it took for the listener to understand it had a set start and finish. So most verbs are seen most often in the preterite and essentially mean something slightly different in the imperfect. But some verbs are actually more common in the imperfect. These include verbs about mental and emotional processes like pensar, creer, saber, conocer, etc. In fact saber and conocer mean something different in the preterite. They mean learned and met respectively since those are the related actions which have a defined start and stop. If you said that you lived in Mexico for a year, that would use the preterite, but if you were discussing something that happened when you lived on Mexico without discussing the duration, you probably would use the imperfect. The past perfect has that unclear beginning and end inherent in the tense, so it almost always uses the imperfect of haber, and the past of hay is most often había.

So to recap, for this sentence if you used the imperfect here it would mean that you and whoever made up the we routinely watched a particular program, not that you had seen a particular episode or one time program. This is where the used to comes from.

0
Reply5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/FredricMac

Nevermind.. I use el "misma" instead of "mismo". Nosotros mirabamos el mismo programa is accepted.

0
Reply5 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/JohnJ796651

For "We watched the same program" I put "Vimos la misma programa" but DL marked it wrong. Said answer was, "Vimos la misma funcion". Checked another source and my answer was correct.

0
Reply4 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/lynettemcw
lynettemcw
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Actually, John, your answer was not quite correct, but you fell victim to one of Duo's least helpful corrections. The word programa in Spanish is actually masculine like several words ending in ma of Greek origin. El idioma is another one. So the correct answer would be Vimos el mismo programa.

http://www.spanishdict.com/translate/Programa

For some strange reason Duo often comes up with a word with some tenuous possibility of being appropriate simply because it is the same gender as you falsely assigned to the appropriate word you were trying to use. It makes absolutely no sense, but I have seen it again and again. There are a couple of other ways Duo gets you off track the same way, but now that you know about the problem, the trick is often as simple as coming into this discussion and checking preferred translation at the top of the page. Duo has very limited error messages and often gives people the wrong understanding of their error, but I never understood why "You used the wrong gender" could not be easily programmed in to Duo.

0
Reply4 months ago