"Ma sœur est sculpteur et elle a du talent."

Translation:My sister is a sculptor, and she has talent.

July 18, 2020

16 Comments
This discussion is locked.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BevRCarson

sculptress is the English female version


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Vic3141

But is going out of favour


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/nickevitt

It is, but it's still a word according to Collins. To be fair I wouldn't necessarily use it day to day unless there was a specific reason to make reference to the sculptor's gender - but I used it here for exactly that reason - to tell Duo that I realised that the sculptor in question was female. It may be a dated word but it's certainly not one to be marked wrong!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/David917415

"Sculptress" is in my Random House College Dictionary, defined as "a female sculptor." It's strange that Duolingo isn't accepting it.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/DOette

So sculpteur is one of those nouns that does not change gender based on the person with that talent?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GrahamNdP

Interestingly, in the translate to French write-in exercise, Duo accepts both « une sculpteuse » & « une sculptrice » ! :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ReinholdHa8

should it not be the female form "la sculptrice"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ReinholdHa8

Le Petit Robert says: on rencontre parfois le fém. la SCUPLTRICE And I consider this dictionary quite an authority....


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Graham207673

I too would consider Robert to be quite an authority and I have the complete and unabridged version (a great slab of a dictionary) but it isn't in there. I also have a similar heavy weight Larousse Advanced dictionary and it isn't in there either but the Robert is the 2006 edition and the Larousse is the 2007 edition so I'm concerned that these dictionaries are out of date. I would be surprised if 'sculptrice' had since gained favour when in English the term 'actress' is increasingly frowned upon as a sexist term within the industry. I see that the word 'sculptrice' is recognised as a word by a number of sources but the more I dig the more confused I become.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GraemeSarg

Larousse online says:

La forme sculptrice existe ; bien qu'en accord avec la tendance actuelle à féminiser les noms de métiers, elle reste rare.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ReinholdHa8

La sculptrice might indeed have lost favour as in my Petit Robert (Grand Format) version from 1996 it is still mentioned as stated before; and if it is gone in the 2006 version that you have, the trend is clear. Though La Sculptrice can be found in the online in Leo (which I certainly do not regard as such a reference...) https://dict.leo.org/französisch-deutsch/sculptrice - Let's leave it here, else we start splitting hairs.... :-)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JohnSabin

I think this translates/reads better as " and she is talented"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Noelmichae2

Why not 'sculpteuse'?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GrahamNdP

It is accepted in the reverse exercise! :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Farkas-89

is "... elle est douée" accepted?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GrahamNdP

You're looking for the reverse translation which is here: https://forum.duolingo.com/comment/40611765

They don't accept « douée », only « ... elle est talentueuse » ! :)

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