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"After having gotten out of his cage, the lion laughed!"

Translation:Après être sorti de sa cage, le lion a rigolé !

July 18, 2020

16 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jeffydarko

My rejected version: "Après s'être échappé de sa cage, le lion a ri". I have searched, but have not yet found the reason for the rejection.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/pacecarotepatate

It could be echappe is only for escaping but the phrase was about getting out. Similar but not the same concept exactly..


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jeffydarko

Your post makes sense. Thank you.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/roOodie

I think maybe the reflexive isn't needed. Après avoir échappé á sa cage....

https://www.wordreference.com/fren/échapper


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/jeffydarko

Very helpful link, thank you. After doing a bit more research and reviewing the input from you (Roody-Roo) and pacecarotepatate:
(1) "After having gotten out of his cage, the lion laughed!" (The exact phrase given by Duolingo) = "Après être sorti de sa cage, le lion a rigolé !" (The translation given by Duolingo). FORMS WITH ÉCHAPPER::
(2a) "Après s'être échappé de sa cage, le lion a ri !" = "After having escaped his cage, the lion laughed!" (2b) "Après avoir échappé à sa cage, le lion a ri !" = "After escaping his cage, the lion laughed!"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/ElaineLegg

'Gotten' is not a word in English - just saying :)


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/BrianBoru4

It certainly is in American English.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/pacecarotepatate

Le lion a rit is not ok?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/relox84

The past participle is ri


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/pacecarotepatate

Oh gosh, of course! Thanks have a lingot


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Stick.to.it

"le lion a ri" works, if the rest of the sentence is correct


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/TimODonnel7

I'm afraid in uk English, it's like being transported back to Elizabethan times - the 1st Elizabeth, not the 2nd. It's a good reminder of how we are "divided " by our common language!


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/JoBorn1

I found this in the cooking section? Writers are trained to come up with words to replace "gotten"


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/KatherineL808285

I expected "echapper" for gotten out which seemed to imply an element of difficulty. To me 'sortir' would be gone out. Is this some strange nuance of American English the rest of us can't pick up?

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