"With a little effort, you will get your degree."

Translation:Avec un peu d'effort, tu obtiendras ton diplôme.

July 18, 2020

17 Comments
This discussion is locked.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/HelenSmith409579

Why is efforts plural here?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Seattle_Scott

Peu d'effort and peu d'efforts should both be accepted. There are many examples of both in French.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Myktylgaan

I've reported it again: 6/8/2020


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MichaelDix197959

Exactly my question. There's nothing to say it's plural and 'un peu' would suggest singular d'effort. Could someone enlighten me?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/rickmcgrath

Why not 'licence' for degree?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/RatchPatch

I was confused by this too. I'm in the UK and when we say a degree, we generally mean a bachelor's degree: a BA (Bachelor of Arts) or a BSC (Bachelor of Science).

Would love an American to come on and clarify what they (and, by extension, Duo) mean by degree, but suspect it's what Myktylgaan says and some sort of mini degree or diploma.

For me, using British English, I think: licence = degree and diplome = diploma of some sort. I just have to remember that for Duo licence = bachelor's degree and diplome = degree.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Seenoff

Confusion reigns again with Dualingo


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/taclarky

Almost exactly the same here in the US. I find this distinction of Duo's confusing.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Myktylgaan

Licence seems to be reserved to talk about a bachelor's degree. The diplôme must correspond to a diploma of some sort, which is a different thing for me in Australia.. not sure about where you are.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/rickmcgrath

I'm in the UK. A degree is a bachelor's degree. A diploma is a certificate to show you have passed a course of some sort, eg how to make pasta, although probably more commonly a certificate to show you have passed certain secondary school education requirements. A diploma is certainly not a degree.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GraemeSarg

So if France has now standardised on a Bachelor's Degree being "une licence", why is there all this talk of "un diplôme" ?

And what does "un diplômé" now mean? Someone who didn't finish their studies?

Is "un licencié" the correct term for a graduate?


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Wheck

hello! why can't we use petit? something about quality vs quantity? thanks


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Katherine82873

Petit is used to describe the size of some specific thing. In this case, we're talking about "a little" or a small amount of an uncountable thing. Un peu is used to talk about a small amount of something uncountable.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Annie819494

Duo gave an example before: en faisant un petit effort, oui, probablement.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/MarioPiekh

Great. So? Duo won't change the correct answers automatically


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/GraemeSarg

"Avec un peu d'effort, tu obtiendras ta licence." is still not accepted. Reported.


https://www.duolingo.com/profile/Max685224

Why would 'licence' be a mistake? It has been translated as 'degree' of 'bachelor's degree' in many prior lessons.

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