"Ellaintentavertelevisión."

Translation:She tries watching television.

5 years ago

22 Comments


https://www.duolingo.com/BrandonSpe

She intends to watch television.... why shouldnt this work

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/corilati

Could this not also be translated as "she is trying to watch television"? Seeing as Spanish does not split the present tense into present progressive (is trying) and simple present (tries)? This has never been an issue before - DL has accommodated both present forms...

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/LoriQuaid
LoriQuaid
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That's what I was taught outside Duolingo, but during Duolingo exercises, I have been marked off for translating Spanish present tense using an English present participle.

4 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DavidReaga
DavidReaga
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Sometimes the present progressive is accepted, other times not; I have been unable to find a guideline concerning this.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jfGor
jfGor
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I guess by 'present progressive', you mean the English present participle used as a noun called the gerund in English, like in this Duo sentence. Is that right?

In Spanish the present participle can not be used as a noun, such as this sentence. The infinitive has to be used 'ver'. But in English we can use it as a noun as well as the infinitive.

eg: Fishing is fun or To fish is fun. In Spanish it has to use the infinitive. Pescar es divertido

HERE IS SOMETHING I FOUND Hope this helps a little. It might take more research.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DavidReaga
DavidReaga
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Hi, thanks for the reply. In this sentence I was referring to 'intenta' rather than 'ver', in response to corilati's original post. There have been many lessons that allowed the present progressive (which like you said uses the gerund as the object of a state of being verb) as an English translation for an ordinary Spanish present tense.

An example from memory: 'Yo como' could mean either 'I eat' or 'I am eating'. The source you provided did not appear to address this, only the infinitive.

I am a beginner student of Spanish and am making no statement about what is or isn't appropriate, just hoping to ask useful questions. I'll keep an eye out for some resources and post them here if successful.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jfGor
jfGor
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Oh, I see. I don't know where my head was. I have gone through the whole tree and I can tell you, it is rare that Duo will use the English present progressive tense as a translation for present tense, even if the text books say it could mean it. It is only on those rare occasions when there would be no other way to translate it that Duo will use the present progressive as a translation for present tense. It prefers to reserve that for when something is happening at that moment in time. If I think of an example, I will come back and post it. I suppose I have been no help at all.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/DavidReaga
DavidReaga
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I have not yet made it through the entire tree, so this is a good insight for me and others. Thank you.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Taruni2

I thought "I am eating" is "estoy comiendo" in Spanish. So "yo como", or "como" would therefore simply be "I eat"....

Someone please correct me if I'm wrong.

1 week ago

https://www.duolingo.com/SamuelOrr

I think the verb mirar may be more appropriate in this context. I think "ver" has more of a sense of "seeing" as opposed to watching.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Daalianer
Daalianer
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According to leo.org and Langenscheidt online dictionary you can use both: ver/mirar la televisión, but with the article "la". According to Pons online dictionary there is only "ver la tele(visión). All three dictionaries use the article.

3 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Cheryl797502

I used the article and was marked wrong

1 month ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jfGor
jfGor
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Yeah, I agree. I never thought of 'ver' meaning to watch. I can't remember if i reported it or not.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/bobsledred

Isn't "ver" to see and "mirar" to watch?

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/Babella

"Ver" means both "see" and "watch" most of the times, "mirar" is "look".

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/antonmo
antonmo
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¿por qué se omita el artículo? ¿por qué no es “ella intenta ver la televisión” ? ¿son ambos correctos?

2 months ago

https://www.duolingo.com/eshewan

I know this would not be the common meaning, but wouldn't "She tries to see the television" technically be correct? For instance, if she was trying to see a TV as an object, not the program it's displaying?

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/rmcgwn

I believe if that were the case you may need the article before television. It's an object not an action. Maybe.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/eshewan

ooooo yea that sounds right. Thanks!

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/jfGor
jfGor
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One of the correct answers I was given was "she tries to watch television'. I did not think of ver as meaning to watch. Hopefully I will remember it from now on. I put 'she tries to see television and got dinged. I reported my answer should be right, but I agree to watch sounds better.

5 years ago

https://www.duolingo.com/pakainin

"She tries to see the tv," is wrong but one of the correct answers is "She tries to see tv," which sounds more awkward.

3 years ago
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